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Article: Cross-cultural analysis of the Wikipedia community

TitleCross-cultural analysis of the Wikipedia community
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 2010, v. 61 n. 10, p. 2097-2108 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article reports a cross-cultural analysis of four Wikipedias in different languages and demonstrates their roles as communities of practice (CoPs). Prior research on CoPs and on the Wikipedia community often lacks cross-cultural analysis. Despite the fact that over 75% of Wikipedia is written in languages other than English, research on Wikipedia primarily focuses on the English Wikipedia and tends to overlook Wikipedias in other languages. This article first argues that Wikipedia communities can be analyzed and understood as CoPs. Second, norms of behaviors are examined in four Wikipedia languages (English, Hebrew, Japanese, and Malay), and the similarities and differences across these four languages are reported. Specifically, typical behaviors on three types of discussion spaces (talk, user talk, and Wikipedia talk) are identified and examined across languages. Hofstede's dimensions of cultural diversity as well as the size of the community and the function of each discussion area provide lenses for understanding the similarities and differences. As such, this article expands the research on online CoPs through an examination of cultural variations across multiple CoPs and increases our understanding of Wikipedia communities in various languages. © 2010 ASIS&T.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194287
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.452
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHara, N-
dc.contributor.authorShachaf, P-
dc.contributor.authorHew, KF-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-30T03:32:24Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-30T03:32:24Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 2010, v. 61 n. 10, p. 2097-2108-
dc.identifier.issn1532-2882-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194287-
dc.description.abstractThis article reports a cross-cultural analysis of four Wikipedias in different languages and demonstrates their roles as communities of practice (CoPs). Prior research on CoPs and on the Wikipedia community often lacks cross-cultural analysis. Despite the fact that over 75% of Wikipedia is written in languages other than English, research on Wikipedia primarily focuses on the English Wikipedia and tends to overlook Wikipedias in other languages. This article first argues that Wikipedia communities can be analyzed and understood as CoPs. Second, norms of behaviors are examined in four Wikipedia languages (English, Hebrew, Japanese, and Malay), and the similarities and differences across these four languages are reported. Specifically, typical behaviors on three types of discussion spaces (talk, user talk, and Wikipedia talk) are identified and examined across languages. Hofstede's dimensions of cultural diversity as well as the size of the community and the function of each discussion area provide lenses for understanding the similarities and differences. As such, this article expands the research on online CoPs through an examination of cultural variations across multiple CoPs and increases our understanding of Wikipedia communities in various languages. © 2010 ASIS&T.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology-
dc.titleCross-cultural analysis of the Wikipedia community-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/asi.21373-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957200419-
dc.identifier.hkuros244647-
dc.identifier.volume61-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spage2097-
dc.identifier.epage2108-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282778400011-

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