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Article: Continued reduction in the incidence of birth trauma and birth asphyxia related to instrumental deliveries after the study period: Was this the Hawthorne effect?

TitleContinued reduction in the incidence of birth trauma and birth asphyxia related to instrumental deliveries after the study period: Was this the Hawthorne effect?
Authors
Issue Date2007
Citation
European Journal of Obstetrics Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, 2007, v. 130 n. 2, p. 165-168 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The incidence of birth trauma and birth asphyxia related to instrumental deliveries in our obstetric unit was high (2.8%) in 1998-1999. A study was performed in 2000 to identify the risk factors. Unexpectedly, the incidence (0.6%) was reduced significantly during the study period. We attributed this phenomenon to the famous Hawthorne effect (tendency to improve performance because of awareness of being studied). Objectives: The objectives were to study whether there is a continued reduction in the incidence of birth trauma and birth asphyxia related to instrumental deliveries in the post-study period (2001-2003) and to investigate the presence of underlying confounding factors apart from the Hawthorne effect. Method: To compare the hospital obstetric statistics among the pre-study period (1998-1999), the study period (2000) and the post-study period (2001-2003), in particular the incidence of birth trauma and birth asphyxia related to instrumental deliveries, the instrumental delivery rate, the overall Caesarean section rate, the Caesarean section rate for no progress of labour, the incidence of failed instrumental delivery, the incidence of attempted instrumental delivery in the operating theatre, and incidence of direct second-stage Caesarean sections. Results: The incidence of birth trauma and birth asphyxia related to instrumental deliveries (0.6%) during the study period (2000) was significantly lower than that (2.8%) during the pre-study period (1998-1999; RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.11-0.70). This phenomenon continued into the post-study period (2001-2003) when the incidence of 1.0% was similarly lower than that in the pre-study period (RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.20-0.64). The instrumental delivery rate decreased further in the post-study period (13.5%) compared with those in the study (16.6%) and pre-study (19.5%) periods (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.75-0.89 and RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.65-0.74, respectively). There was a marked increase in the direct second-stage Caesarean section rate in the post-study period (7.1%) compared to those in the study (0.4%) and pre-study (0.7%) periods (RR 15.9, 95% CI 5.05-49.73 and RR 9.77, 95% CI 5.28-18.08, respectively). Conclusion: A change in obstetric practice was identified that may explain the continued reduction in the incidence of birth trauma and birth asphyxia related to instrumental deliveries in the post-study period. © 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194175
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.662
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.808
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WC-
dc.contributor.authorChan, BCP-
dc.contributor.authorMa, G-
dc.contributor.authorLam, KW-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KY-
dc.contributor.authorPun, TC-
dc.contributor.authorLao, TT-
dc.contributor.authorLee, CP-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-30T03:32:15Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-30T03:32:15Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Obstetrics Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, 2007, v. 130 n. 2, p. 165-168-
dc.identifier.issn0301-2115-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194175-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The incidence of birth trauma and birth asphyxia related to instrumental deliveries in our obstetric unit was high (2.8%) in 1998-1999. A study was performed in 2000 to identify the risk factors. Unexpectedly, the incidence (0.6%) was reduced significantly during the study period. We attributed this phenomenon to the famous Hawthorne effect (tendency to improve performance because of awareness of being studied). Objectives: The objectives were to study whether there is a continued reduction in the incidence of birth trauma and birth asphyxia related to instrumental deliveries in the post-study period (2001-2003) and to investigate the presence of underlying confounding factors apart from the Hawthorne effect. Method: To compare the hospital obstetric statistics among the pre-study period (1998-1999), the study period (2000) and the post-study period (2001-2003), in particular the incidence of birth trauma and birth asphyxia related to instrumental deliveries, the instrumental delivery rate, the overall Caesarean section rate, the Caesarean section rate for no progress of labour, the incidence of failed instrumental delivery, the incidence of attempted instrumental delivery in the operating theatre, and incidence of direct second-stage Caesarean sections. Results: The incidence of birth trauma and birth asphyxia related to instrumental deliveries (0.6%) during the study period (2000) was significantly lower than that (2.8%) during the pre-study period (1998-1999; RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.11-0.70). This phenomenon continued into the post-study period (2001-2003) when the incidence of 1.0% was similarly lower than that in the pre-study period (RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.20-0.64). The instrumental delivery rate decreased further in the post-study period (13.5%) compared with those in the study (16.6%) and pre-study (19.5%) periods (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.75-0.89 and RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.65-0.74, respectively). There was a marked increase in the direct second-stage Caesarean section rate in the post-study period (7.1%) compared to those in the study (0.4%) and pre-study (0.7%) periods (RR 15.9, 95% CI 5.05-49.73 and RR 9.77, 95% CI 5.28-18.08, respectively). Conclusion: A change in obstetric practice was identified that may explain the continued reduction in the incidence of birth trauma and birth asphyxia related to instrumental deliveries in the post-study period. © 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Obstetrics Gynecology and Reproductive Biology-
dc.titleContinued reduction in the incidence of birth trauma and birth asphyxia related to instrumental deliveries after the study period: Was this the Hawthorne effect?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ejogrb.2006.02.013-
dc.identifier.pmid16567034-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33846251550-
dc.identifier.volume130-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage165-
dc.identifier.epage168-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000244283600004-

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