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Presentation: A perceptual study of monosyllabic Mandarin tones produced by three-year-old children growing up in Taiwan

TitleA perceptual study of monosyllabic Mandarin tones produced by three-year-old children growing up in Taiwan
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherAcoustical Society of America. The Journal's web site is located at http://asa.aip.org/jasa.html
Citation
Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 2011, v. 130 n. 4, p. 2574 How to Cite?
AbstractWong et al. (2005) reported that monolingual Mandarin-speaking three-year-old children in the U.S. have not produced adult-like Mandarin lexical tones in monosyllabic words. This study adopted the same methods to examine monosyllabic Mandarin tones produced by three-year-old children in Taiwan. Four hundred and thirty eight monosyllabic tones were collected from ten children and seven mothers in Taiwan. These productions and the 92 productions by the four U.S. mothers reported in Wong et al. (2005) were low-pass filtered to retain pitch information, but eliminate lexical information, and were presented to five Mandarin-speaking adults in Taiwan for tone categorization. U.S. mothers' tones were categorized with ceiling accuracies, similar to those judged by U.S. Mandarin-speaking adults reported in Wong et al. (2005). Taiwan mothers' tones were judged with lower accuracies, with the accuracy of tone 2 significantly lower than U.S. mothers'. Taiwan children's four tones were judged with 63%, 24%, 27%, and 74% accuracy, all significantly lower than US and Taiwan mothers except for tone 1. Children made more errors in tones 2 and 3 than tones 1 and 4. These findings were consistent with those in Wong et al. (2005), suggesting similar developmental patterns for children growing up in the U.S. and Taiwan.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194063
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.572
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.938

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, PS-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-29T06:01:39Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-29T06:01:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the Acoustical Society of America, 2011, v. 130 n. 4, p. 2574-
dc.identifier.issn0001-4966-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194063-
dc.description.abstractWong et al. (2005) reported that monolingual Mandarin-speaking three-year-old children in the U.S. have not produced adult-like Mandarin lexical tones in monosyllabic words. This study adopted the same methods to examine monosyllabic Mandarin tones produced by three-year-old children in Taiwan. Four hundred and thirty eight monosyllabic tones were collected from ten children and seven mothers in Taiwan. These productions and the 92 productions by the four U.S. mothers reported in Wong et al. (2005) were low-pass filtered to retain pitch information, but eliminate lexical information, and were presented to five Mandarin-speaking adults in Taiwan for tone categorization. U.S. mothers' tones were categorized with ceiling accuracies, similar to those judged by U.S. Mandarin-speaking adults reported in Wong et al. (2005). Taiwan mothers' tones were judged with lower accuracies, with the accuracy of tone 2 significantly lower than U.S. mothers'. Taiwan children's four tones were judged with 63%, 24%, 27%, and 74% accuracy, all significantly lower than US and Taiwan mothers except for tone 1. Children made more errors in tones 2 and 3 than tones 1 and 4. These findings were consistent with those in Wong et al. (2005), suggesting similar developmental patterns for children growing up in the U.S. and Taiwan.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAcoustical Society of America. The Journal's web site is located at http://asa.aip.org/jasa.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Acoustical Society of America-
dc.rightsJournal of the Acoustical Society of America. Copyright © Acoustical Society of America.-
dc.rightsCopyright (2011) Acoustical Society of America. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America. The following article appeared in Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 2011, v. 130 n. 4, p. 2574 and may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.3655322-
dc.titleA perceptual study of monosyllabic Mandarin tones produced by three-year-old children growing up in Taiwanen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, PS: puisanw@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1121/1.3655322-
dc.identifier.volume130-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage2574-
dc.identifier.epage2574-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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