File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)

Conference Paper: Effectiveness of an integrated adventure-based training and health education program in promoting physical activity among childhood cancer survivors

TitleEffectiveness of an integrated adventure-based training and health education program in promoting physical activity among childhood cancer survivors
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
The 15th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology and Psychosocial Academy (IPOS 2013), Rotterdam, Netherlands, 4–8 November 2013. In Psycho-Oncology, 2013, v. 22 suppl. 3, p. 74-75, abstract no. W-3 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Research indicates that regular physical activity enhances the physical and psychological well-being of childhood cancer survivors. Nevertheless, there is growing concern about declining levels of physical activity in childhood cancer survivors. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of an integrated adventure-based training and health education program in promoting changes in exercise behavior and enhancing the physical activity levels, self-efficacy, and quality of life of Hong Kong Chinese childhood cancer survivors. METHOD: A randomized controlled trial, two-group pretest and repeated post-test, betweensubjects design was conducted to 71 childhood cancer survivors (9–16-year olds). Participants in the experimental group joined a four-day integrated adventure-based training and health education program. Control group participants received the same amount of time and attention as the experimental group, but not in such a way as to have any specific effect on the outcome measures. Participants’ exercise behavior changes, levels of physical activity, self-efficacy and quality of life were assessed at the time of recruitment, 3, 6, and 9 months after starting the intervention. RESULTS: Participants in the experimental group reported statistically significant difference in physical activity stages of change (p < 0.001), higher levels of physical activity (p < 0.001) and self-efficacy (p = 0.04) than those in the control group. Besides, there were statistically significant mean differences (p < 0.001) in physical activity levels ( 2.6), self-efficacy ( 2.0) and quality of life ( 4.3) of participants in the experimental group from baseline to 9 months after starting the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: The integrated adventure-based training and health education program was found to be effective in promoting physical activity among childhood cancer survivors. RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS: This study did not measure physiological changes in the participants, although previous research has indicated that engaging in physical activity may help to ameliorate adverse treatment-related effects such as fatigue and decreased muscle strength and endurance. Therefore, it is recommended that future longitudinal studies be conducted to monitor the level of physical activity and physical activity behavior of childhood cancer survivors, and to detect any physiological changes that occur over an extended period of time. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: (1) To advocate the idea of having regular physical activity in childhood cancer survivors, and (2) To implement the integrated adventure-based training and education program to those survivors without engaging in regular physical activity, and (3) Healthcare professionals should go beyond their normal roles by building partnerships with schools and communities to promote the adoption and maintenance of regular physical activity among childhood cancer survivors using a multi-disciplinary approach. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF FUNDING: None.
DescriptionConference theme: Innovation in Psycho-Oncology: Clinical Care, Research and Advocacy
Oral presentation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193977
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, WHCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, OKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-28T06:40:10Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-28T06:40:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 15th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology and Psychosocial Academy (IPOS 2013), Rotterdam, Netherlands, 4–8 November 2013. In Psycho-Oncology, 2013, v. 22 suppl. 3, p. 74-75, abstract no. W-3en_US
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193977-
dc.descriptionConference theme: Innovation in Psycho-Oncology: Clinical Care, Research and Advocacy-
dc.descriptionOral presentation-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Research indicates that regular physical activity enhances the physical and psychological well-being of childhood cancer survivors. Nevertheless, there is growing concern about declining levels of physical activity in childhood cancer survivors. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of an integrated adventure-based training and health education program in promoting changes in exercise behavior and enhancing the physical activity levels, self-efficacy, and quality of life of Hong Kong Chinese childhood cancer survivors. METHOD: A randomized controlled trial, two-group pretest and repeated post-test, betweensubjects design was conducted to 71 childhood cancer survivors (9–16-year olds). Participants in the experimental group joined a four-day integrated adventure-based training and health education program. Control group participants received the same amount of time and attention as the experimental group, but not in such a way as to have any specific effect on the outcome measures. Participants’ exercise behavior changes, levels of physical activity, self-efficacy and quality of life were assessed at the time of recruitment, 3, 6, and 9 months after starting the intervention. RESULTS: Participants in the experimental group reported statistically significant difference in physical activity stages of change (p < 0.001), higher levels of physical activity (p < 0.001) and self-efficacy (p = 0.04) than those in the control group. Besides, there were statistically significant mean differences (p < 0.001) in physical activity levels ( 2.6), self-efficacy ( 2.0) and quality of life ( 4.3) of participants in the experimental group from baseline to 9 months after starting the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: The integrated adventure-based training and health education program was found to be effective in promoting physical activity among childhood cancer survivors. RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS: This study did not measure physiological changes in the participants, although previous research has indicated that engaging in physical activity may help to ameliorate adverse treatment-related effects such as fatigue and decreased muscle strength and endurance. Therefore, it is recommended that future longitudinal studies be conducted to monitor the level of physical activity and physical activity behavior of childhood cancer survivors, and to detect any physiological changes that occur over an extended period of time. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: (1) To advocate the idea of having regular physical activity in childhood cancer survivors, and (2) To implement the integrated adventure-based training and education program to those survivors without engaging in regular physical activity, and (3) Healthcare professionals should go beyond their normal roles by building partnerships with schools and communities to promote the adoption and maintenance of regular physical activity among childhood cancer survivors using a multi-disciplinary approach. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF FUNDING: None.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807-
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncologyen_US
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.titleEffectiveness of an integrated adventure-based training and health education program in promoting physical activity among childhood cancer survivorsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, WHC: william3@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChung, OK: joychung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, WHC=rp00528en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChung, OK=rp00250en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1099-1611.2013.3393-
dc.identifier.hkuros227520en_US
dc.identifier.volume22-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 3-
dc.identifier.spage74, abstract no. W-3-
dc.identifier.epage75-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats