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Article: What is the ‘significance’ of choking in sport? A commentary on Mesagno and Hill

TitleWhat is the ‘significance’ of choking in sport? A commentary on Mesagno and Hill
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherEdizioni Luigi Pozzi srl. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijsp-online.com
Citation
International Journal of Sport Psychology, 2013, v. 44 n. 4, p. 278-280 How to Cite?
AbstractChoking, as Mesagno and Hill (2013) acknowledge, is a colloquial term that describes events that sometimes occur in real life when performers are highly motivated to succeed. The term is emotive and evokes strong imagery, so it is popularly used in the media. Use of the term by researchers, however, often raises confusion. Mesagno and Hill point out that current definitions are inadequate and they highlight the need for a clear definition of ‘choking’ in order to help guide researchers in the quest to better understand it as a phenomenon. Psychologists have typically defined choking as under performance in a highly pressured environment when striving for optimal success (e.g., Baumeister, 1984). Such a definition leaves it necessary to determine whether the level of underperformance that occurred was significant enough to warrant use of the term ‘choke’. In sport, the term is typically used when a performer (or a team) fails to win when seemingly in an insurmountable position. The failure needs to result from uncharacteristic mistakes, rather than an opponent’s good skill, but even this can result in confusion. Not only is it often difficult to determine whether the player(s) got worse or the opponent( s) got better, but the two are confounded, for as one gets worse, the other may get better.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193940
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.871
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.331

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBuszard, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorFarrow, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-28T06:36:05Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-28T06:36:05Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Sport Psychology, 2013, v. 44 n. 4, p. 278-280en_US
dc.identifier.issn0047-0767-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193940-
dc.description.abstractChoking, as Mesagno and Hill (2013) acknowledge, is a colloquial term that describes events that sometimes occur in real life when performers are highly motivated to succeed. The term is emotive and evokes strong imagery, so it is popularly used in the media. Use of the term by researchers, however, often raises confusion. Mesagno and Hill point out that current definitions are inadequate and they highlight the need for a clear definition of ‘choking’ in order to help guide researchers in the quest to better understand it as a phenomenon. Psychologists have typically defined choking as under performance in a highly pressured environment when striving for optimal success (e.g., Baumeister, 1984). Such a definition leaves it necessary to determine whether the level of underperformance that occurred was significant enough to warrant use of the term ‘choke’. In sport, the term is typically used when a performer (or a team) fails to win when seemingly in an insurmountable position. The failure needs to result from uncharacteristic mistakes, rather than an opponent’s good skill, but even this can result in confusion. Not only is it often difficult to determine whether the player(s) got worse or the opponent( s) got better, but the two are confounded, for as one gets worse, the other may get better.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherEdizioni Luigi Pozzi srl. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijsp-online.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Sport Psychologyen_US
dc.titleWhat is the ‘significance’ of choking in sport? A commentary on Mesagno and Hillen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros227425en_US
dc.identifier.volume44en_US
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage278en_US
dc.identifier.epage280en_US
dc.publisher.placeItalyen_US

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