File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

postgraduate thesis: Overcrowding in emergency departments in Hong Kong and interventions to improve emergency care

TitleOvercrowding in emergency departments in Hong Kong and interventions to improve emergency care
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Lin, J. [林俊伟]. (2013). Overcrowding in emergency departments in Hong Kong and interventions to improve emergency care. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5098751
AbstractBackground Emergency department (ED) overcrowding has become a worldwide problem over the past few years, which has been reported in USA, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. For the past two decades, ED overcrowding has also become a controversial issue in Hong Kong, due to high demand for emergency service and misuse of emergency services. In 2002, although there was a charge for emergency department visit which led to a markedly decrease (19.1%) of total attendance, but now the rising trend of ED overcrowding seems to resurface during past few years. This paper aims to review and synthesis causes of ED overcrowding and possible interventions so as to provide possible recommendations for emergency care in Hong Kong. Methods Literatures on ED overcrowding and potential interventions were searched from PubMed, Google Scholar and Google to locate all relevant articles in English up to May 2013. Through PubMed, ED was described using “Emergency Medicine [MeSH]” OR “emergency department” OR “emergency”, and overcrowding was described using “Crowding [MeSH]” OR “crowded” OR “overcrowding” OR “overcrowded” OR “congestion”, and interventions was described using “interventions” OR “solutions”. Besides, relevant emergency medicine literatures published from the Hong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine were also reviewed. Results I identified and reviewed relevant articles and found that ED attendance has been steadily rising during the past decades in Hong Kong. Although the causes may be somewhat different between different countries, causes of ED overcrowding could be related to easy access to emergency services, barriers to primary care as well as specialist care, and the rising aging population which might be an important underlying cause. As the problem of ED overcrowding will have significant negative impact on patient outcomes, such as unnecessary death, two common interventions to the problem are increasing the resources and demand management. Apart from increasing resources within emergency departments to cater for the increasing demand, it is of highly significance to improve community and primary care for the needs of older people who will contribute a great proportion to ED overcrowding in the future. Conclusion Semi-urgent and non-urgent visits do account for a great proportion among the total attendance, so it is important triage these patients to alleviate the overcrowding. What’s more, pressure on EDs can be related to a significant increase in the number of elderly patients who may require more investigation or admissions, and need much longer time to manage. As a result, future health policies should focus more on the aging population to improve emergency care.
DegreeMaster of Public Health
SubjectEmergency medical services - China - Hong Kong
Dept/ProgramPublic Health
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193798

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, Junwei-
dc.contributor.author林俊伟-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-27T23:10:47Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-27T23:10:47Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationLin, J. [林俊伟]. (2013). Overcrowding in emergency departments in Hong Kong and interventions to improve emergency care. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5098751-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193798-
dc.description.abstractBackground Emergency department (ED) overcrowding has become a worldwide problem over the past few years, which has been reported in USA, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. For the past two decades, ED overcrowding has also become a controversial issue in Hong Kong, due to high demand for emergency service and misuse of emergency services. In 2002, although there was a charge for emergency department visit which led to a markedly decrease (19.1%) of total attendance, but now the rising trend of ED overcrowding seems to resurface during past few years. This paper aims to review and synthesis causes of ED overcrowding and possible interventions so as to provide possible recommendations for emergency care in Hong Kong. Methods Literatures on ED overcrowding and potential interventions were searched from PubMed, Google Scholar and Google to locate all relevant articles in English up to May 2013. Through PubMed, ED was described using “Emergency Medicine [MeSH]” OR “emergency department” OR “emergency”, and overcrowding was described using “Crowding [MeSH]” OR “crowded” OR “overcrowding” OR “overcrowded” OR “congestion”, and interventions was described using “interventions” OR “solutions”. Besides, relevant emergency medicine literatures published from the Hong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine were also reviewed. Results I identified and reviewed relevant articles and found that ED attendance has been steadily rising during the past decades in Hong Kong. Although the causes may be somewhat different between different countries, causes of ED overcrowding could be related to easy access to emergency services, barriers to primary care as well as specialist care, and the rising aging population which might be an important underlying cause. As the problem of ED overcrowding will have significant negative impact on patient outcomes, such as unnecessary death, two common interventions to the problem are increasing the resources and demand management. Apart from increasing resources within emergency departments to cater for the increasing demand, it is of highly significance to improve community and primary care for the needs of older people who will contribute a great proportion to ED overcrowding in the future. Conclusion Semi-urgent and non-urgent visits do account for a great proportion among the total attendance, so it is important triage these patients to alleviate the overcrowding. What’s more, pressure on EDs can be related to a significant increase in the number of elderly patients who may require more investigation or admissions, and need much longer time to manage. As a result, future health policies should focus more on the aging population to improve emergency care.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshEmergency medical services - China - Hong Kong-
dc.titleOvercrowding in emergency departments in Hong Kong and interventions to improve emergency care-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5098751-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Public Health-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePublic Health-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5098751-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats