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postgraduate thesis: Implementation and evaluation of evidence-based practice guidelines for open endotracheal suctioning in mechanically-ventilated adult patients

TitleImplementation and evaluation of evidence-based practice guidelines for open endotracheal suctioning in mechanically-ventilated adult patients
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Tang, S. A. [鄧兆庭]. (2013). Implementation and evaluation of evidence-based practice guidelines for open endotracheal suctioning in mechanically-ventilated adult patients. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5088462
AbstractEndotracheal suctioning is a procedure performed on a daily basis in hospitals, and is mostly take place in intensive care units (ICUs). (Annapoorna, 2005; Day et al, 2009). It helps removing sputum or secretion out from patients’ trachea. For patients who are under mechanical ventilation, this procedure is vital to maintain their airway patency when they are intubated with endotracheal tube or tracheostomized (Finucane & Santora, 2003). However, the procedure has its own risk and complications such as hypoxaemia, atelectasis, cardiovascular instability and more (Thomson, 2000). There are in general two types of endotracheal suctioning: open and closed system. As disconnection of mechanical ventilation from patients is needed for open endotracheal suctioning (OES), it has a higher risk of complications. However, the cost for OES is much cheaper compared to the closed system. Although OES is widely used in Hong Kong, there is no evidence-based guideline for nurses to follow. The guideline developed by American Association of Respiratory Care (2010) is lack of specificity on the target population and its recommendations were based on mixed literatures targeting on adult and infant patients. Therefore, the aim of this dissertation is to develop an evidence-based guideline for OES in adult patients under mechanical ventilation in ICU. To develop a guideline for OES, search was performed in multiple electronic databases (British Nursing Index, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Ovid MEDLINE, and PubMed) with keywords related to OES and its complications. A total of 457 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and 11 of them were selected. The selected studies were evaluated by quality appraisal checklists, which are developed by Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). Data were extracted for developing the guideline. Evidence have shown that the incidence of post-OES hypoxemia can be reduced by performing hyperoxygenation with 100% oxygen for 4-6 breaths prior and after each open endotracheal suction, accompanying with hyperinflation with 150% of patient’s tidal volume at most 8 breaths/40 seconds delivered by ventilator and prohibiting normal saline instillation into trachea for diluting the sputum. The grades of the recommendations in the guideline were rated with using of the SIGN grading system. The implementation potential was analyzed by the patients’ characteristics, transferability of the findings, feasibility of implementation and cost-benefit ratio. A 12-month implementation program was developed including communication with stakeholders, 4-week pilot testing, and training of ICU staffs, and implementation of OES guideline. The effectiveness of the guideline will be evaluated based on the primary outcome (i.e. oxygen level in blood) for detecting the incidence of hypoxemia. Also, the acceptability of the guideline, compliance of the guideline, financial cost reduction and better quality of service will be used as other evaluation indicators.
DegreeMaster of Nursing
SubjectArtificial respiration
Trachea - Intubation
Dept/ProgramNursing Studies
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193027

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, Siu-ting, Alvin-
dc.contributor.author鄧兆庭-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-14T10:12:16Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-14T10:12:16Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationTang, S. A. [鄧兆庭]. (2013). Implementation and evaluation of evidence-based practice guidelines for open endotracheal suctioning in mechanically-ventilated adult patients. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5088462-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193027-
dc.description.abstractEndotracheal suctioning is a procedure performed on a daily basis in hospitals, and is mostly take place in intensive care units (ICUs). (Annapoorna, 2005; Day et al, 2009). It helps removing sputum or secretion out from patients’ trachea. For patients who are under mechanical ventilation, this procedure is vital to maintain their airway patency when they are intubated with endotracheal tube or tracheostomized (Finucane & Santora, 2003). However, the procedure has its own risk and complications such as hypoxaemia, atelectasis, cardiovascular instability and more (Thomson, 2000). There are in general two types of endotracheal suctioning: open and closed system. As disconnection of mechanical ventilation from patients is needed for open endotracheal suctioning (OES), it has a higher risk of complications. However, the cost for OES is much cheaper compared to the closed system. Although OES is widely used in Hong Kong, there is no evidence-based guideline for nurses to follow. The guideline developed by American Association of Respiratory Care (2010) is lack of specificity on the target population and its recommendations were based on mixed literatures targeting on adult and infant patients. Therefore, the aim of this dissertation is to develop an evidence-based guideline for OES in adult patients under mechanical ventilation in ICU. To develop a guideline for OES, search was performed in multiple electronic databases (British Nursing Index, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Ovid MEDLINE, and PubMed) with keywords related to OES and its complications. A total of 457 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and 11 of them were selected. The selected studies were evaluated by quality appraisal checklists, which are developed by Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). Data were extracted for developing the guideline. Evidence have shown that the incidence of post-OES hypoxemia can be reduced by performing hyperoxygenation with 100% oxygen for 4-6 breaths prior and after each open endotracheal suction, accompanying with hyperinflation with 150% of patient’s tidal volume at most 8 breaths/40 seconds delivered by ventilator and prohibiting normal saline instillation into trachea for diluting the sputum. The grades of the recommendations in the guideline were rated with using of the SIGN grading system. The implementation potential was analyzed by the patients’ characteristics, transferability of the findings, feasibility of implementation and cost-benefit ratio. A 12-month implementation program was developed including communication with stakeholders, 4-week pilot testing, and training of ICU staffs, and implementation of OES guideline. The effectiveness of the guideline will be evaluated based on the primary outcome (i.e. oxygen level in blood) for detecting the incidence of hypoxemia. Also, the acceptability of the guideline, compliance of the guideline, financial cost reduction and better quality of service will be used as other evaluation indicators.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshArtificial respiration-
dc.subject.lcshTrachea - Intubation-
dc.titleImplementation and evaluation of evidence-based practice guidelines for open endotracheal suctioning in mechanically-ventilated adult patients-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5088462-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Nursing-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineNursing Studies-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5088462-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

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