File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

postgraduate thesis: Premorbid functioning : correlations with social functioning and clinical symptoms in first-episode psychosis, using baseline data from the JCEP 4-year RCT study

TitlePremorbid functioning : correlations with social functioning and clinical symptoms in first-episode psychosis, using baseline data from the JCEP 4-year RCT study
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Cheung, L. L. [張樂嘉]. (2013). Premorbid functioning : correlations with social functioning and clinical symptoms in first-episode psychosis, using baseline data from the JCEP 4-year RCT study. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5088200
AbstractThe current study analysed baseline data from the Jockey Club Early Psychosis (JCEP) 4-year RCT study (still underway). The aims were to (1) examine whether the correlations between premorbid functioning and the outcome variables of social functioning and clinical symptoms were significant in baseline measurements of the JCEP study, and (2) pave the way for the examination of the persistence of these correlations at 4 year follow-up, after the completion of the JCEP study. 360 first-episode adult-onset psychosis patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders were recruited from all inpatient and outpatient psychiatric units in Hong Kong since 2009. Premorbid functioning was measured by the Premorbid Adjustment Scale (PAS). Social functioning was measured by the Role Functioning Scale (RFS) and Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS). Clinical symptoms were measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), and Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS). Premorbid adjustment was significantly correlated with social functioning and negative symptoms; patients with poorer premorbid adjustment had worse social functioning and more severe negative symptoms. Positive symptoms were not significantly correlated with premorbid adjustment. There were no gender differences in premorbid adjustment. The majority of patients had a pattern of good premorbid adjustment (adequate to good levels of premorbid adjustment across all age-specific time periods). There were no significant differences in the outcome variables between the premorbid adjustment patterns. The current study findings have important clinical implications, in terms of advising the use of more effective and personalized interventions and treatment regimens on patients. In addition, the examination of premorbid adjustment facilitates early detection and identification of high risk psychosis individuals, which may help to reduce the duration of untreated psychosis.
DegreeMaster of Psychological Medicine
SubjectPsychoses
Dept/ProgramPsychological Medicine
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192976

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Lok-ka, Lily-
dc.contributor.author張樂嘉-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-14T06:23:23Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-14T06:23:23Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationCheung, L. L. [張樂嘉]. (2013). Premorbid functioning : correlations with social functioning and clinical symptoms in first-episode psychosis, using baseline data from the JCEP 4-year RCT study. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5088200-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192976-
dc.description.abstractThe current study analysed baseline data from the Jockey Club Early Psychosis (JCEP) 4-year RCT study (still underway). The aims were to (1) examine whether the correlations between premorbid functioning and the outcome variables of social functioning and clinical symptoms were significant in baseline measurements of the JCEP study, and (2) pave the way for the examination of the persistence of these correlations at 4 year follow-up, after the completion of the JCEP study. 360 first-episode adult-onset psychosis patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders were recruited from all inpatient and outpatient psychiatric units in Hong Kong since 2009. Premorbid functioning was measured by the Premorbid Adjustment Scale (PAS). Social functioning was measured by the Role Functioning Scale (RFS) and Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS). Clinical symptoms were measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), and Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS). Premorbid adjustment was significantly correlated with social functioning and negative symptoms; patients with poorer premorbid adjustment had worse social functioning and more severe negative symptoms. Positive symptoms were not significantly correlated with premorbid adjustment. There were no gender differences in premorbid adjustment. The majority of patients had a pattern of good premorbid adjustment (adequate to good levels of premorbid adjustment across all age-specific time periods). There were no significant differences in the outcome variables between the premorbid adjustment patterns. The current study findings have important clinical implications, in terms of advising the use of more effective and personalized interventions and treatment regimens on patients. In addition, the examination of premorbid adjustment facilitates early detection and identification of high risk psychosis individuals, which may help to reduce the duration of untreated psychosis.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshPsychoses-
dc.titlePremorbid functioning : correlations with social functioning and clinical symptoms in first-episode psychosis, using baseline data from the JCEP 4-year RCT study-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5088200-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Psychological Medicine-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePsychological Medicine-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5088200-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats