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postgraduate thesis: Impaired facilitation of self-control cognition by glucose in patients with schizophrenia : a randomized controlled study

TitleImpaired facilitation of self-control cognition by glucose in patients with schizophrenia : a randomized controlled study
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Leung, C. [梁重皿]. (2013). Impaired facilitation of self-control cognition by glucose in patients with schizophrenia : a randomized controlled study. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5087778
AbstractObjective: Studies in healthy individuals show that exerting self-control consumes cognitive resources, which reduces subsequent self-control performance. This is termed as the self-control depletion effect. Restoring the availability of blood glucose eliminates this impairment, which is deemed as the glucose facilitation effect. Patients with schizophrenia are found to have self-regulatory dysfunctions. This study aims to investigate whether patient’s (a) glucose facilitation effects will be impaired, and (b) will have exaggerated depletion in a self-control task, as compared with healthy population. Method: Forty patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and forty normal controls were recruited. This was a two drinks (glucose vs. placebo) x two depleting phases (self-control depleted vs. non-depleted) between-groups design. We examined the blood glucose levels before and after the self-control depletion phase and the subsequent performances in two self-control tasks (handgrip and Stroop Test) after the drink condition. Results: The four groups (depleting x glucose, depleting x placebo, non-depleting x glucose and non-depleting x placebo) of both patients and normal controls were comparable on a number of characteristics. The change in blood glucose level in the depleting group was significantly different from those in the non-depleting group. Two x two between-subjects ANOVAs were carried out to test the performances in the handgrip and Stroop task. Significant interactions were found in healthy controls regarding both tasks. However, a significant interaction was only found in patients regarding the handgrip task but not the Stroop task. Conclusions: This study demonstrated an impaired glucose facilitation effect in patients during a cognitive self-control task but not physical self-control task. The findings also suggested for the first time that a self-control depletion effect is intact in patients with schizophrenia, comparing with healthy individuals.
DegreeMaster of Psychological Medicine
SubjectSchizophrenics - Psychology
Dept/ProgramPsychological Medicine
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192967

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Chung-ming-
dc.contributor.author梁重皿-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-14T06:23:21Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-14T06:23:21Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationLeung, C. [梁重皿]. (2013). Impaired facilitation of self-control cognition by glucose in patients with schizophrenia : a randomized controlled study. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5087778-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192967-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Studies in healthy individuals show that exerting self-control consumes cognitive resources, which reduces subsequent self-control performance. This is termed as the self-control depletion effect. Restoring the availability of blood glucose eliminates this impairment, which is deemed as the glucose facilitation effect. Patients with schizophrenia are found to have self-regulatory dysfunctions. This study aims to investigate whether patient’s (a) glucose facilitation effects will be impaired, and (b) will have exaggerated depletion in a self-control task, as compared with healthy population. Method: Forty patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and forty normal controls were recruited. This was a two drinks (glucose vs. placebo) x two depleting phases (self-control depleted vs. non-depleted) between-groups design. We examined the blood glucose levels before and after the self-control depletion phase and the subsequent performances in two self-control tasks (handgrip and Stroop Test) after the drink condition. Results: The four groups (depleting x glucose, depleting x placebo, non-depleting x glucose and non-depleting x placebo) of both patients and normal controls were comparable on a number of characteristics. The change in blood glucose level in the depleting group was significantly different from those in the non-depleting group. Two x two between-subjects ANOVAs were carried out to test the performances in the handgrip and Stroop task. Significant interactions were found in healthy controls regarding both tasks. However, a significant interaction was only found in patients regarding the handgrip task but not the Stroop task. Conclusions: This study demonstrated an impaired glucose facilitation effect in patients during a cognitive self-control task but not physical self-control task. The findings also suggested for the first time that a self-control depletion effect is intact in patients with schizophrenia, comparing with healthy individuals.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshSchizophrenics - Psychology-
dc.titleImpaired facilitation of self-control cognition by glucose in patients with schizophrenia : a randomized controlled study-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5087778-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Psychological Medicine-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePsychological Medicine-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5087778-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

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