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Article: A veil of ignorance: Public perceptions of Islam in the United States and their educational implications

TitleA veil of ignorance: Public perceptions of Islam in the United States and their educational implications
Authors
KeywordsIslam
Education
International Relations
Multiculturalism
Culture
Educational Theory
Issue Date2007
PublisherCommon Ground. The Journal's web site is located at http://ijh.cgpublisher.com
Citation
International Journal of the Humanities, 2007, v. 5 n. 4, p. 157-164 How to Cite?
AbstractMany people in the United States gain most of their information about Islam, Muslims, and events in the Middle East from mainstream media sources. Since September 11, 2001, the need to know about Islam has increased in the schools while biased misrepresentations have dominated. This paper answers the question, how has the media shaped representations of Islam in US schools since September 11, 2001? First I discuss the general and educational need to know in light of media responses to 9/11 before exploring some of the major educational responses. I argue that representations of Islam today in US public schools reflect a divisive politics of representation going on in the United States today at large, around the nature of Islam and American interventions in the Middle East. I contrast two different educational accounts of Islam to explore the educational effects of the post-9/11 US political climate.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192934
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.103

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJackson, L-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-11T07:12:58Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-11T07:12:58Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of the Humanities, 2007, v. 5 n. 4, p. 157-164-
dc.identifier.issn1447-9508-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192934-
dc.description.abstractMany people in the United States gain most of their information about Islam, Muslims, and events in the Middle East from mainstream media sources. Since September 11, 2001, the need to know about Islam has increased in the schools while biased misrepresentations have dominated. This paper answers the question, how has the media shaped representations of Islam in US schools since September 11, 2001? First I discuss the general and educational need to know in light of media responses to 9/11 before exploring some of the major educational responses. I argue that representations of Islam today in US public schools reflect a divisive politics of representation going on in the United States today at large, around the nature of Islam and American interventions in the Middle East. I contrast two different educational accounts of Islam to explore the educational effects of the post-9/11 US political climate.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCommon Ground. The Journal's web site is located at http://ijh.cgpublisher.com-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of the Humanities-
dc.rightsInternational Journal of the Humanities. Copyright © Common Ground.-
dc.rightsNOTICE: Readers must contact Common Ground for permission to reproduce.-
dc.subjectIslam-
dc.subjectEducation-
dc.subjectInternational Relations-
dc.subjectMulticulturalism-
dc.subjectCulture-
dc.subjectEducational Theory-
dc.titleA veil of ignorance: Public perceptions of Islam in the United States and their educational implicationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailJackson, L: lizjackson@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.volume5-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage157-
dc.identifier.epage164-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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