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Article: East meets west: Cross-cultural influences in glassmaking in the 18th and 19th centuries

TitleEast meets west: Cross-cultural influences in glassmaking in the 18th and 19th centuries
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherCorning Museum of Glass.
Citation
Journal of Glass Studies, 2010, v. 52, p. 201-216+273-274 How to Cite?
AbstractTechnological knowledge and decorative styles had an impact that is particularly noteworthy in western European and East Asian countries. In the West, the cultural influence of Chinese porcelain and the fashion for chinoiserie led the makers of porcelain and glass to develop new recipes and iconographic themes in imitation of those of the treasured imported wares from the Orient. The stylistic influences of Asia reached all of western Europe, leading to individual interpretations of the imported exotic imagery, but Western styles were not so readily adopted in the East during the 18th century. (They were successful, however, in mid-19th-century Japan.) By contrast, in East Asia, the adopted chemical knowledge of European glass manufacturers allowed local artists to develop new colors and overlay techniques, and to produce, among orher works of art, carved pieces in glass that are related to traditionally fashioned hard-stone objects.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192729
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.129

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKnothe, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-20T04:59:30Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-20T04:59:30Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Glass Studies, 2010, v. 52, p. 201-216+273-274en_US
dc.identifier.issn0075-4250en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192729-
dc.description.abstractTechnological knowledge and decorative styles had an impact that is particularly noteworthy in western European and East Asian countries. In the West, the cultural influence of Chinese porcelain and the fashion for chinoiserie led the makers of porcelain and glass to develop new recipes and iconographic themes in imitation of those of the treasured imported wares from the Orient. The stylistic influences of Asia reached all of western Europe, leading to individual interpretations of the imported exotic imagery, but Western styles were not so readily adopted in the East during the 18th century. (They were successful, however, in mid-19th-century Japan.) By contrast, in East Asia, the adopted chemical knowledge of European glass manufacturers allowed local artists to develop new colors and overlay techniques, and to produce, among orher works of art, carved pieces in glass that are related to traditionally fashioned hard-stone objects.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCorning Museum of Glass.-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Glass Studiesen_US
dc.titleEast meets west: Cross-cultural influences in glassmaking in the 18th and 19th centuriesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78951471754en_US
dc.identifier.volume52en_US
dc.identifier.spage201en_US
dc.identifier.epage216+273en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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