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Article: Higher maternal education is associated with favourable growth of young children in different countries

TitleHigher maternal education is associated with favourable growth of young children in different countries
Authors
Issue Date2013
Citation
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 2013, v. 67 n. 7, p. 595-602 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Childhood growth affects long-term health and could contribute to health inequalities that persist throughout life. Methods We compared growth data of 4-year-old to 6-year-old children born 1997-2002 in UK (n=15 168), Sweden (n=6749) and rural China (n=10 327). SD scores (SDS) were calculated against the WHO Growth Standard. Obesity and overweight were defined by the International Obesity Taskforce cut-offs, and stunting, underweight and thinness by height, weight or body mass index (BMI)<-2 SDS. Associations with maternal education were standardised by calculating the Slope Index of Inequality (SII). Results Mean SDS height, weight and BMI in the UK (-0.01, 0.42, 0.62, respectively) and Sweden (0.45,0.59, 0.45) were higher than in China (-0.98, -0.82,-0.29). Higher maternal education was consistently associated with taller offspring height SDS (SII: UK 0.25;Sweden 0.17; China 1.06). Underweight and stunting were less common in the UK (prevalence: 0.6% and 2.2%, respectively) and Sweden (0.3% and 0.6%) than in China (9.5% and 16.4%), where these outcomes were inversely associated with maternal education (SII:-25.8% and -12.7%). Obesity prevalence in the UK, Sweden and China was 4.8%, 3.7% and 0.4%, respectively. Maternal education was inversely associated with offspring obesity in the UK (SII: -3.3%) and Sweden (-2.8%), but not in China (+0.3%).Conclusions Higher maternal education was associated with more favourable growth in young children: lower obesity and overweight in the UK and Sweden, and lower stunting and underweight in rural China. Public health strategies to optimise growth in early childhood need to acknowledge socioeconomic factors, but possibly with a different emphasis in different settings.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192707
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.865
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.890
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLakshman, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoch, FSen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarcus, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorLudvigsson, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorOng, KKen_US
dc.contributor.authorSobko, Ten_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-20T04:56:16Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-20T04:56:16Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 2013, v. 67 n. 7, p. 595-602en_US
dc.identifier.issn0143-005Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192707-
dc.description.abstractBackground Childhood growth affects long-term health and could contribute to health inequalities that persist throughout life. Methods We compared growth data of 4-year-old to 6-year-old children born 1997-2002 in UK (n=15 168), Sweden (n=6749) and rural China (n=10 327). SD scores (SDS) were calculated against the WHO Growth Standard. Obesity and overweight were defined by the International Obesity Taskforce cut-offs, and stunting, underweight and thinness by height, weight or body mass index (BMI)<-2 SDS. Associations with maternal education were standardised by calculating the Slope Index of Inequality (SII). Results Mean SDS height, weight and BMI in the UK (-0.01, 0.42, 0.62, respectively) and Sweden (0.45,0.59, 0.45) were higher than in China (-0.98, -0.82,-0.29). Higher maternal education was consistently associated with taller offspring height SDS (SII: UK 0.25;Sweden 0.17; China 1.06). Underweight and stunting were less common in the UK (prevalence: 0.6% and 2.2%, respectively) and Sweden (0.3% and 0.6%) than in China (9.5% and 16.4%), where these outcomes were inversely associated with maternal education (SII:-25.8% and -12.7%). Obesity prevalence in the UK, Sweden and China was 4.8%, 3.7% and 0.4%, respectively. Maternal education was inversely associated with offspring obesity in the UK (SII: -3.3%) and Sweden (-2.8%), but not in China (+0.3%).Conclusions Higher maternal education was associated with more favourable growth in young children: lower obesity and overweight in the UK and Sweden, and lower stunting and underweight in rural China. Public health strategies to optimise growth in early childhood need to acknowledge socioeconomic factors, but possibly with a different emphasis in different settings.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology and Community Healthen_US
dc.titleHigher maternal education is associated with favourable growth of young children in different countriesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech-2012-202021en_US
dc.identifier.pmid23450064-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3796351-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84884975318en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros248682-
dc.identifier.volume67en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage595en_US
dc.identifier.epage602en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000320307200011-

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