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Article: Gastrointestinal nitric oxide generation in germ-free and conventional rats

TitleGastrointestinal nitric oxide generation in germ-free and conventional rats
Authors
Issue Date2004
Citation
American Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, 2004, v. 287 n. 5 50-5, p. G993-G997 How to Cite?
AbstractNitric oxide (NO) is a central mediator of various physiological events in the gastrointestinal tract. The influence of the intestinal microflora for NO production in the gut is unknown. Bacteria could contribute to this production either by stimulating the mucosa to produce NO, or they could generate NO themselves. Using germ-free and conventional rats, we measured gaseous NO directly in the gastrointestinal tract and from the luminal contents using a chemiluminescence technique. Mucosal NO production was studied by using an NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, and to evaluate microbial contribution to the NO generation, nitrate was given to the animals. In conventional rats, luminal NO differed profoundly along the gastrointestinal tract with the greatest concentrations in the stomach [>4,000 parts per billion (ppb)] and cecum (≈200 ppb) and lower concentrations in the small intestine and colon (≤20 ppb). Cecal NO correlated with the levels in incubated luminal contents. NOS inhibition lowered NO levels in the colon, without affecting NO in the stomach and in the cecum. Gastric NO increased greatly after a nitrate load, proving it to be a substrate for NO generation. In germ-free rats, NO was low (≤30 ppb) throughout the gastrointestinal tract and absent in the incubated luminal contents. NO also remained low after a nitrate load. Our results demonstrate a pivotal role of the intestinal microflora in gastrointestinal NO generation. Distinctly compartmentalized qualitative and quantitative NO levels in conventional and germ-free rats reflect complex host microbial cross talks, possibly making NO a regulator of the intestinal eco system.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192699
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.297
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.936
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSobko, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorReinders, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorNorin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorMidtvedt, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorGustafsson, LEen_US
dc.contributor.authorLundberg, JOen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-20T04:56:07Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-20T04:56:07Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, 2004, v. 287 n. 5 50-5, p. G993-G997en_US
dc.identifier.issn0193-1857en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192699-
dc.description.abstractNitric oxide (NO) is a central mediator of various physiological events in the gastrointestinal tract. The influence of the intestinal microflora for NO production in the gut is unknown. Bacteria could contribute to this production either by stimulating the mucosa to produce NO, or they could generate NO themselves. Using germ-free and conventional rats, we measured gaseous NO directly in the gastrointestinal tract and from the luminal contents using a chemiluminescence technique. Mucosal NO production was studied by using an NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, and to evaluate microbial contribution to the NO generation, nitrate was given to the animals. In conventional rats, luminal NO differed profoundly along the gastrointestinal tract with the greatest concentrations in the stomach [>4,000 parts per billion (ppb)] and cecum (≈200 ppb) and lower concentrations in the small intestine and colon (≤20 ppb). Cecal NO correlated with the levels in incubated luminal contents. NOS inhibition lowered NO levels in the colon, without affecting NO in the stomach and in the cecum. Gastric NO increased greatly after a nitrate load, proving it to be a substrate for NO generation. In germ-free rats, NO was low (≤30 ppb) throughout the gastrointestinal tract and absent in the incubated luminal contents. NO also remained low after a nitrate load. Our results demonstrate a pivotal role of the intestinal microflora in gastrointestinal NO generation. Distinctly compartmentalized qualitative and quantitative NO levels in conventional and germ-free rats reflect complex host microbial cross talks, possibly making NO a regulator of the intestinal eco system.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiologyen_US
dc.titleGastrointestinal nitric oxide generation in germ-free and conventional ratsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1152/ajpgi.00203.2004en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15256364-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-7044235823en_US
dc.identifier.volume287en_US
dc.identifier.issue5 50-5en_US
dc.identifier.spageG993en_US
dc.identifier.epageG997en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000224382600009-

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