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Article: Generation of NO by probiotic bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract

TitleGeneration of NO by probiotic bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract
Authors
Issue Date2006
Citation
Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 2006, v. 41 n. 6, p. 985-991 How to Cite?
AbstractProbiotic bacteria elicit a number of beneficial effects in the gut but the mechanisms for these health promoting effects are not entirely understood. Recent in vitro data suggest that lactobacilli can utilise nitrate and nitrite to generate nitric oxide, a gas with immunomodulating and antibacterial properties. Here we further characterised intestinal NO generation by bacteria. In rats, dietary supplementation with lactobacilli and nitrate resulted in a 3-8 fold NO increase in the small intestine and caecum, but not in colon. Caecal NO levels correlated to nitrite concentration in luminal contents. In neonates, colonic NO levels correlated to the nitrite content of breast milk and faeces. Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria isolated from the stools of two neonates, generated NO from nitrite in vitro, whereas S. aureus and E. coli rapidly consumed NO. We here show that commensal bacteria can be a significant source of NO in the gut in addition to the mucosal NO production. Intestinal NO generation can be stimulated by dietary supplementation with substrate and lactobacilli. The generation of NO by some probiotic bacteria can be counteracted by rapid NO consumption by other strains. Future studies will clarify the biological role of the bacteria-derived intestinal NO in health and disease. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192695
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.784
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.468
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSobko, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorMidtvedt, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorNorin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorGustafsson, LEen_US
dc.contributor.authorNorman, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorJansson, EÅen_US
dc.contributor.authorLundberg, JOen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-20T04:56:04Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-20T04:56:04Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationFree Radical Biology and Medicine, 2006, v. 41 n. 6, p. 985-991en_US
dc.identifier.issn0891-5849en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192695-
dc.description.abstractProbiotic bacteria elicit a number of beneficial effects in the gut but the mechanisms for these health promoting effects are not entirely understood. Recent in vitro data suggest that lactobacilli can utilise nitrate and nitrite to generate nitric oxide, a gas with immunomodulating and antibacterial properties. Here we further characterised intestinal NO generation by bacteria. In rats, dietary supplementation with lactobacilli and nitrate resulted in a 3-8 fold NO increase in the small intestine and caecum, but not in colon. Caecal NO levels correlated to nitrite concentration in luminal contents. In neonates, colonic NO levels correlated to the nitrite content of breast milk and faeces. Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria isolated from the stools of two neonates, generated NO from nitrite in vitro, whereas S. aureus and E. coli rapidly consumed NO. We here show that commensal bacteria can be a significant source of NO in the gut in addition to the mucosal NO production. Intestinal NO generation can be stimulated by dietary supplementation with substrate and lactobacilli. The generation of NO by some probiotic bacteria can be counteracted by rapid NO consumption by other strains. Future studies will clarify the biological role of the bacteria-derived intestinal NO in health and disease. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFree Radical Biology and Medicineen_US
dc.titleGeneration of NO by probiotic bacteria in the gastrointestinal tracten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2006.06.020en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16934682-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33747368716en_US
dc.identifier.volume41en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage985en_US
dc.identifier.epage991en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000240322100018-

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