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Conference Paper: Risk factors for severe ECC in preschoolers with dental caries

TitleRisk factors for severe ECC in preschoolers with dental caries
Authors
KeywordsCaries
Children and Epidemiology
Issue Date2013
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925
Citation
The 2nd Meeting of the International Association of Dental Research - Asia Pacific Region (IADR-APR), Bangkok, Thailand, 21-23 August 2013. In Journal of Dental Research, 2013, v. 92 n. Special Issue B: abstract no. 418 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: to explore the risk factors of severe ECC among the Hong Kong preschool children who have dental caries. Methods: All children attending grade 1 in 16 kindergartens in different districts in Hong Kong were screened. Ethical approval from IRB and parental consent was obtained. Children with at least one carious cavity were selected and clinically examined by a trained examiner using disposable dental mirrors, periodontal probes and an intra-oral LED light in the kindergartens. The visible plaque index (VPI) and the dmfs index were used for recording the oral hygiene and dental caries status, respectively. Information about the children‘s demographic and socio-economic background (such as age, place of birth, parent’s education level, family income), and oral health related behaviors (such as tooth brushing habit, frequency of snacking) was collected by a questionnaire completed by their parents. Results: A total of 359 children with a mean age of 40.7 months (SD=3.7) were included in this study. Around half (48%) of them had severe ECC (defined as having a dmfs score more than 3) while 52% had a dmfs score of 1 to 3 (non-severe ECC). The mean dmfs scores were 1.4 and 10.0 in non-severe ECC and severe ECC groups, respectively. Over 95% of the decayed teeth in both groups were untreated. Maxillary incisors had the highest caries prevalence at 39%. Results of a backward stepwise logistic regression analysis found that only two variables, namely family income and VPI, remained in the final model (Chi-square=27.2; df=3; p<0.001) while the other studied variables were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Conclusion: Low family income and poor oral hygiene are risk factors for severe ECC among preschool children with dental caries in Hong Kong.
DescriptionConference Theme: We are the Future
Oral Presentation
Session 22: P2
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192580
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDuangthip, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, CHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-18T05:06:48Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-18T05:06:48Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2nd Meeting of the International Association of Dental Research - Asia Pacific Region (IADR-APR), Bangkok, Thailand, 21-23 August 2013. In Journal of Dental Research, 2013, v. 92 n. Special Issue B: abstract no. 418en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192580-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: We are the Future-
dc.descriptionOral Presentation-
dc.descriptionSession 22: P2-
dc.description.abstractObjective: to explore the risk factors of severe ECC among the Hong Kong preschool children who have dental caries. Methods: All children attending grade 1 in 16 kindergartens in different districts in Hong Kong were screened. Ethical approval from IRB and parental consent was obtained. Children with at least one carious cavity were selected and clinically examined by a trained examiner using disposable dental mirrors, periodontal probes and an intra-oral LED light in the kindergartens. The visible plaque index (VPI) and the dmfs index were used for recording the oral hygiene and dental caries status, respectively. Information about the children‘s demographic and socio-economic background (such as age, place of birth, parent’s education level, family income), and oral health related behaviors (such as tooth brushing habit, frequency of snacking) was collected by a questionnaire completed by their parents. Results: A total of 359 children with a mean age of 40.7 months (SD=3.7) were included in this study. Around half (48%) of them had severe ECC (defined as having a dmfs score more than 3) while 52% had a dmfs score of 1 to 3 (non-severe ECC). The mean dmfs scores were 1.4 and 10.0 in non-severe ECC and severe ECC groups, respectively. Over 95% of the decayed teeth in both groups were untreated. Maxillary incisors had the highest caries prevalence at 39%. Results of a backward stepwise logistic regression analysis found that only two variables, namely family income and VPI, remained in the final model (Chi-square=27.2; df=3; p<0.001) while the other studied variables were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Conclusion: Low family income and poor oral hygiene are risk factors for severe ECC among preschool children with dental caries in Hong Kong.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Researchen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectCaries-
dc.subjectChildren and Epidemiology-
dc.titleRisk factors for severe ECC in preschoolers with dental cariesen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, ECM: hrdplcm@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChu, CH: chchu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ECM=rp00015en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChu, CH=rp00022en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros226810en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros226767-
dc.identifier.volume92en_US
dc.identifier.issueSpecial Issue B: abstract no. 418en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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