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Conference Paper: App-solutely fabulous! But are they effective for oral health promotion?

TitleApp-solutely fabulous! But are they effective for oral health promotion?
Authors
KeywordsBehavioral science
Children
Home care
Oral hygiene and Preventive dentistry
Issue Date2013
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925
Citation
The 2nd Meeting of the International Association of Dental Research - Asia Pacific Region (IADR-APR), Bangkok, Thailand, 21-23 August 2013. In Journal of Dental Research, 2013, v. 92 n. Special Issue B: abstract no. 46 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To evaluate the effectiveness of ‘apps’ in an oral health promotion initiative to improve knowledge, behaviour and task performance. Method: A case-control study involving 582 6/7-year-old children at two primary schools. The control school received conventional oral health promotion (i.e. talk and leaflet distribution). The test (case) school received conventional oral health promotion plus exposure to an oral health promotion ‘app’. Differences in knowledge, behaviour and task performance were investigated and compared between schools (pre- and post- intervention). Result: The response rate to the study was 97.9% (570/582). There were significant changes in oral health knowledge (p<0.001), oral health behaviour (p<0.001) and in task performance (p<0.001) for both groups following the interventions. However, changes in knowledge, behaviour, and task performance between the test and control groups were not significantly different (p>0.05). Greater active participation was observed among the test group compared to the control group. Conclusion: The use of ‘app’ in conjunction with conventional oral health promotion is effective in improving oral health knowledge, oral health behaviour and task performance. However, the adjunct use of ‘app’ does not appear to enhance the effectiveness of conventional oral health promotion methods. ‘Apps’ are great for active participation but may not be 'absolutely fabulous'.
DescriptionConference Theme: We are the Future
Poster Presentation
Session 8: P1-Joseph Lister Award Competition (SEA)
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192575
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAu, SWWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorFok, MRen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, CYen_US
dc.contributor.authorMak, CWen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, CKKen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, KYen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, CPJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-18T05:06:46Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-18T05:06:46Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2nd Meeting of the International Association of Dental Research - Asia Pacific Region (IADR-APR), Bangkok, Thailand, 21-23 August 2013. In Journal of Dental Research, 2013, v. 92 n. Special Issue B: abstract no. 46en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192575-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: We are the Future-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation-
dc.descriptionSession 8: P1-Joseph Lister Award Competition (SEA)-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate the effectiveness of ‘apps’ in an oral health promotion initiative to improve knowledge, behaviour and task performance. Method: A case-control study involving 582 6/7-year-old children at two primary schools. The control school received conventional oral health promotion (i.e. talk and leaflet distribution). The test (case) school received conventional oral health promotion plus exposure to an oral health promotion ‘app’. Differences in knowledge, behaviour and task performance were investigated and compared between schools (pre- and post- intervention). Result: The response rate to the study was 97.9% (570/582). There were significant changes in oral health knowledge (p<0.001), oral health behaviour (p<0.001) and in task performance (p<0.001) for both groups following the interventions. However, changes in knowledge, behaviour, and task performance between the test and control groups were not significantly different (p>0.05). Greater active participation was observed among the test group compared to the control group. Conclusion: The use of ‘app’ in conjunction with conventional oral health promotion is effective in improving oral health knowledge, oral health behaviour and task performance. However, the adjunct use of ‘app’ does not appear to enhance the effectiveness of conventional oral health promotion methods. ‘Apps’ are great for active participation but may not be 'absolutely fabulous'.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Researchen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectBehavioral science-
dc.subjectChildren-
dc.subjectHome care-
dc.subjectOral hygiene and Preventive dentistry-
dc.titleApp-solutely fabulous! But are they effective for oral health promotion?en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailMcGrath, CPJ: mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcGrath, CPJ=rp00037en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros226805en_US
dc.identifier.volume92en_US
dc.identifier.issueSpecial Issue B: abstract no. 46en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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