File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Apps for oral self-care: a systematic assessment of their quality

TitleApps for oral self-care: a systematic assessment of their quality
Authors
KeywordsBehavioral science
Children
Oral hygiene
Preventive dentistry and Systematic review
Issue Date2013
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925
Citation
The 2nd Meeting of the International Association of Dental Research - Asia Pacific Region (IADR-APR), Bangkok, Thailand, 21-23 August 2013. In Journal of Dental Research, 2013, v. 92 n. Special Issue B: abstract no. 21 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: ‘Apps’ have been enthusiastically adopted by the general public. This study aimed to conduct a systematic review of currently available iPhone Apps, and to assess the degree to which current apps for toothbrushing offer appropriate quality to support oral self-care. Method: A search for iPhone Apps was conducted using keywords (13) for oral self-care. Descriptions of Apps were reviewed to identify ‘potentially effective’ Apps, which were then downloaded and reviewed (47). Ultimately 45 Apps were considered as ‘effective’ for this review. A standardized approach to assess (A) comprehensiveness of oral-self care information based on the scientific basis of oral health education for toothbrushing (6-items) and (B) technological assessment of the Apps (9-items) was employed. Result: Initial screening identified 187 Apps, 46 were identified as ‘potentially effective’ Apps, and finally 45 Apps were considered as ‘effective’ and subsequently reviewed. No App provided comprehensive information in line with best practice for toothbrushing. Frequency of toothbrushing was not indicated by 60.0% (27); recommended time for toothbrushing was not indicated by 40.0% (18); type of toothbrush was not indicated by 71.1% (32); approximately half (51.1%, 23) did not indicate a toothbrushing technique; how to assess effectiveness of toothbrushing was not indicated by 66.7% (30); but most offered some level of interaction (71.1%, 32). Technological assessments of Apps indicated that they were generally poor. Of note most failed to disclose funding (84.4%, 38) or upheld confidentiality requirements (97.8%, 44), and approximately half (48.9%, 22) did not disclose the purpose of the App. Conclusion: A plethora of Apps for oral self- care exists for iPhone. The quality of the Apps to support oral self-care is generally low with many failing to provide information in line with best practices. In addition, technological problems are abundant.
DescriptionConference Theme: We are the Future
Oral Presentation
Session 4: O4
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192572
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, CPJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-18T05:06:45Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-18T05:06:45Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2nd Meeting of the International Association of Dental Research - Asia Pacific Region (IADR-APR), Bangkok, Thailand, 21-23 August 2013. In Journal of Dental Research, 2013, v. 92 n. Special Issue B: abstract no. 21en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192572-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: We are the Future-
dc.descriptionOral Presentation-
dc.descriptionSession 4: O4-
dc.description.abstractObjective: ‘Apps’ have been enthusiastically adopted by the general public. This study aimed to conduct a systematic review of currently available iPhone Apps, and to assess the degree to which current apps for toothbrushing offer appropriate quality to support oral self-care. Method: A search for iPhone Apps was conducted using keywords (13) for oral self-care. Descriptions of Apps were reviewed to identify ‘potentially effective’ Apps, which were then downloaded and reviewed (47). Ultimately 45 Apps were considered as ‘effective’ for this review. A standardized approach to assess (A) comprehensiveness of oral-self care information based on the scientific basis of oral health education for toothbrushing (6-items) and (B) technological assessment of the Apps (9-items) was employed. Result: Initial screening identified 187 Apps, 46 were identified as ‘potentially effective’ Apps, and finally 45 Apps were considered as ‘effective’ and subsequently reviewed. No App provided comprehensive information in line with best practice for toothbrushing. Frequency of toothbrushing was not indicated by 60.0% (27); recommended time for toothbrushing was not indicated by 40.0% (18); type of toothbrush was not indicated by 71.1% (32); approximately half (51.1%, 23) did not indicate a toothbrushing technique; how to assess effectiveness of toothbrushing was not indicated by 66.7% (30); but most offered some level of interaction (71.1%, 32). Technological assessments of Apps indicated that they were generally poor. Of note most failed to disclose funding (84.4%, 38) or upheld confidentiality requirements (97.8%, 44), and approximately half (48.9%, 22) did not disclose the purpose of the App. Conclusion: A plethora of Apps for oral self- care exists for iPhone. The quality of the Apps to support oral self-care is generally low with many failing to provide information in line with best practices. In addition, technological problems are abundant.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Researchen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectBehavioral science-
dc.subjectChildren-
dc.subjectOral hygiene-
dc.subjectPreventive dentistry and Systematic review-
dc.titleApps for oral self-care: a systematic assessment of their qualityen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailMcGrath, CPJ: mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcGrath, CPJ=rp00037en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros226802en_US
dc.identifier.volume92en_US
dc.identifier.issueSpecial Issue B: abstract no. 21en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats