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Conference Paper: Oral health status and dental erosion of Chinese university students

TitleOral health status and dental erosion of Chinese university students
Authors
KeywordsCaries
Epidemiology
Erosion and Periodontal disease
Issue Date2012
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925
Citation
The 6th International Association for Dental Research Pan-European Region Meeting (IADR/PER), Helsinki, Finland, 12-15 September 2012. In Journal of Dental Research, 2012, v. 91 n. Special Issue C: abstract no. 361 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To describe caries experience, periodontal status, prevalence and severity of dental erosion of Chinese students of a university in Hong Kong. Methods: A sample of first-year local Chinese students was invited to attend the campus dental clinic of a university in Hong Kong. A questionnaire survey was performed to investigate the determinants of their dental erosion status including socio-demographic factors, toothbrushing habits, dietary habit (such as frequency of consuming fruit juices and fizzy drinks), duration since last dental visit and self-perceived dental erosion status. A clinical examination was conducted to study their caries experience and periodontal status using Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth (DMFT) index and Community Periodontal Index (CPI), respectively. Dental erosion was evaluated using modified Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE). Results: Totally 700 participants were recruited. The mean DMFT score was 2.5±2.8 (±SD). The two commonest CPI scores were 0 and 1, affecting on average 4.7±1.7 sextants of the participants. Twenty-four students (3.4%) had moderate to deep periodontal pockets. Almost half of the participants (326/700, 47%) showed at least some signs of erosion (Maximum BEWE>0). Upper posterior teeth were the commonest teeth showing signs of dental erosion. Severe erosion (BEWE=3) affects only 2% (16/700) of participants. Logistic regression found age (OR=1.11, p<0.001) and self-perceived mal-alignment of teeth (OR=1.65, p=0.002) were factors affect prevalence of dental erosion. No correlation was found between self-perceived erosion status and BEWE score. Conclusions: In this study, the caries experience in DMFT of the Chinese university students was 2.5. About 3% of them had periodontal pockets. Almost half of them had sign of dental erosion, but only 2% of them showed sign of severe erosion.
DescriptionPoster Presentation
Session 50: Behavioral, Epidemiologic and Health Services Research II
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192506
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChu, CHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChau, AMHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-15T02:20:42Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-15T02:20:42Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 6th International Association for Dental Research Pan-European Region Meeting (IADR/PER), Helsinki, Finland, 12-15 September 2012. In Journal of Dental Research, 2012, v. 91 n. Special Issue C: abstract no. 361en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192506-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation-
dc.descriptionSession 50: Behavioral, Epidemiologic and Health Services Research II-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To describe caries experience, periodontal status, prevalence and severity of dental erosion of Chinese students of a university in Hong Kong. Methods: A sample of first-year local Chinese students was invited to attend the campus dental clinic of a university in Hong Kong. A questionnaire survey was performed to investigate the determinants of their dental erosion status including socio-demographic factors, toothbrushing habits, dietary habit (such as frequency of consuming fruit juices and fizzy drinks), duration since last dental visit and self-perceived dental erosion status. A clinical examination was conducted to study their caries experience and periodontal status using Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth (DMFT) index and Community Periodontal Index (CPI), respectively. Dental erosion was evaluated using modified Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE). Results: Totally 700 participants were recruited. The mean DMFT score was 2.5±2.8 (±SD). The two commonest CPI scores were 0 and 1, affecting on average 4.7±1.7 sextants of the participants. Twenty-four students (3.4%) had moderate to deep periodontal pockets. Almost half of the participants (326/700, 47%) showed at least some signs of erosion (Maximum BEWE>0). Upper posterior teeth were the commonest teeth showing signs of dental erosion. Severe erosion (BEWE=3) affects only 2% (16/700) of participants. Logistic regression found age (OR=1.11, p<0.001) and self-perceived mal-alignment of teeth (OR=1.65, p=0.002) were factors affect prevalence of dental erosion. No correlation was found between self-perceived erosion status and BEWE score. Conclusions: In this study, the caries experience in DMFT of the Chinese university students was 2.5. About 3% of them had periodontal pockets. Almost half of them had sign of dental erosion, but only 2% of them showed sign of severe erosion.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Researchen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectCaries-
dc.subjectEpidemiology-
dc.subjectErosion and Periodontal disease-
dc.titleOral health status and dental erosion of Chinese university studentsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChu, CH: chchu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChu, CH=rp00022en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros226759en_US
dc.identifier.volume91en_US
dc.identifier.issueSpecial Issue C: abstract no. 361-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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