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Article: Theoretical discussion on forms of cultural capital in Singapore

TitleTheoretical discussion on forms of cultural capital in Singapore
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/education/journal/12564
Citation
Asia Pacific Education Review, 2013, v. 14 n. 2, p. 103-112 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article is a theoretical discussion on five forms of cultural resources that constitute cultural capital for children in the meritocratic yet stratified society of Singapore. These five forms of cultural capital are namely ‘academic’ tastes and leisure preferences, use of Standard English, access to and dispositions toward information communication technology, acquisition of learning skills, and confidence/learning dispositions. They cover two important aspects of cultural capital—namely objectified and embodied components—that may vary in levels with social class and that mediate the influence of social class on children’s academic achievement. Equally importantly, the focus on one societal context—in this case, Singapore—recognizes the contextual specificities of cultural capital in form and consumption pattern among individuals.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192229
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.394
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.371
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTan, CYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-23T09:29:01Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-23T09:29:01Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationAsia Pacific Education Review, 2013, v. 14 n. 2, p. 103-112en_US
dc.identifier.issn1598-1037en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192229-
dc.description.abstractThis article is a theoretical discussion on five forms of cultural resources that constitute cultural capital for children in the meritocratic yet stratified society of Singapore. These five forms of cultural capital are namely ‘academic’ tastes and leisure preferences, use of Standard English, access to and dispositions toward information communication technology, acquisition of learning skills, and confidence/learning dispositions. They cover two important aspects of cultural capital—namely objectified and embodied components—that may vary in levels with social class and that mediate the influence of social class on children’s academic achievement. Equally importantly, the focus on one societal context—in this case, Singapore—recognizes the contextual specificities of cultural capital in form and consumption pattern among individuals.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/education/journal/12564-
dc.relation.ispartofAsia Pacific Education Reviewen_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleTheoretical discussion on forms of cultural capital in Singaporeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12564-013-9257-xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84879256525en_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage103en_US
dc.identifier.epage112en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000320576500001-

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