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Article: Monosyllabic Mandarin tone productions by 3-year-olds growing up in Taiwan and in the United States: Interjudge reliability and perceptual results

TitleMonosyllabic Mandarin tone productions by 3-year-olds growing up in Taiwan and in the United States: Interjudge reliability and perceptual results
Authors
Issue Date2012
Citation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 2012, v. 55 n. 5, p. 1423-1437 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: The author compared monosyllabic Mandarin lexical tones produced by 3-year-old Mandarin-speaking children growing up in Taiwan and in the United States. Method: Following the procedures in Wong, Schwartz, and Jenkins (2005), the author collected monosyllabic tone productions from 3-year-old Mandarin-speaking children in Taiwan and low-pass filtered them to eliminate lexical information but retain tone information. Five Mandarin-speaking adults residing in Taiwan categorized these filtered tones and those produced by the Mandarin-speaking children growing up in the United States, the latter of which was reported in Wong et al. (2005) . Agreements on tone categorization by judges residing in Taiwan and in the United States were evaluated. Tone accuracy of children growing up in Taiwan and the United States were examined and compared. Results: The Mandarin-speaking judges residing in the United States and in Taiwan showed high agreements on tone categorization. None of the 4 tones produced by the Mandarin-speaking children growing up in the United States and in Taiwan was adultlike.Children in Taiwan made more errors in Tone 2 and Tone 4 than didMandarin-speaking children growing up in the United States. Accuracy rates of Tone 1 and Tone 3 were comparable in the 2 groups of children. Conclusion: Mandarin tone acquisition is a protracted process. Three-year-old Mandarin-speaking children growing up in Taiwan and the United States show similar developmental patterns and have not yet produced monosyllabic tones with adultlike accuracy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192206
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.526
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.970
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-23T09:28:06Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-23T09:28:06Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 2012, v. 55 n. 5, p. 1423-1437en_US
dc.identifier.issn1092-4388en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192206-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The author compared monosyllabic Mandarin lexical tones produced by 3-year-old Mandarin-speaking children growing up in Taiwan and in the United States. Method: Following the procedures in Wong, Schwartz, and Jenkins (2005), the author collected monosyllabic tone productions from 3-year-old Mandarin-speaking children in Taiwan and low-pass filtered them to eliminate lexical information but retain tone information. Five Mandarin-speaking adults residing in Taiwan categorized these filtered tones and those produced by the Mandarin-speaking children growing up in the United States, the latter of which was reported in Wong et al. (2005) . Agreements on tone categorization by judges residing in Taiwan and in the United States were evaluated. Tone accuracy of children growing up in Taiwan and the United States were examined and compared. Results: The Mandarin-speaking judges residing in the United States and in Taiwan showed high agreements on tone categorization. None of the 4 tones produced by the Mandarin-speaking children growing up in the United States and in Taiwan was adultlike.Children in Taiwan made more errors in Tone 2 and Tone 4 than didMandarin-speaking children growing up in the United States. Accuracy rates of Tone 1 and Tone 3 were comparable in the 2 groups of children. Conclusion: Mandarin tone acquisition is a protracted process. Three-year-old Mandarin-speaking children growing up in Taiwan and the United States show similar developmental patterns and have not yet produced monosyllabic tones with adultlike accuracy.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Researchen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleMonosyllabic Mandarin tone productions by 3-year-olds growing up in Taiwan and in the United States: Interjudge reliability and perceptual resultsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0273)en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22361103-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867095994en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros230611-
dc.identifier.volume55en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage1423en_US
dc.identifier.epage1437en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000314529800014-

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