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Conference Paper: Correlations between tonality and word order type

TitleCorrelations between tonality and word order type
Authors
Issue Date2013
Citation
The 10th Biennial Conference of the Association for Linguistic Typology (ALT-10), Leipzig, Germany, 15-18 August 2013. How to Cite?
AbstractExploring the prosodic typology of language, Gil (1986) argues for extending the typology for metered verse to ordinary language based on 170 languages. Among the results observed is an indirect correlation between word order type and the presence of lexical tone: iambic languages tend to be VO and tonal, while trochaic languages tend to be OV and non-tonal. Gil’s hypothesis that the most basic distinction is between iambic and trochaic feet, however, cannot be tested using the World Atlas of Language Structures online (WALS) due to insufficient data; many languages with complex tone systems are arguably iambic (Thai, Chaozhou) or cannot be categorized as either iambic or trochaic (Cantonese). More explanatory factors are thus …
DescriptionPoster Presentation: abstract 105
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192049

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYiu, SSYen_US
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, SJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-15T07:48:39Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-15T07:48:39Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 10th Biennial Conference of the Association for Linguistic Typology (ALT-10), Leipzig, Germany, 15-18 August 2013.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192049-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation: abstract 105-
dc.description.abstractExploring the prosodic typology of language, Gil (1986) argues for extending the typology for metered verse to ordinary language based on 170 languages. Among the results observed is an indirect correlation between word order type and the presence of lexical tone: iambic languages tend to be VO and tonal, while trochaic languages tend to be OV and non-tonal. Gil’s hypothesis that the most basic distinction is between iambic and trochaic feet, however, cannot be tested using the World Atlas of Language Structures online (WALS) due to insufficient data; many languages with complex tone systems are arguably iambic (Thai, Chaozhou) or cannot be categorized as either iambic or trochaic (Cantonese). More explanatory factors are thus …-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBiennial Conference of the Association for Linguistic Typology, ALT-10en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleCorrelations between tonality and word order typeen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, SSY: syutji@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMatthews, SJ: matthews@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMatthews, SJ=rp01207en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros223771en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros226255-

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