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Conference Paper: Variability in the immunogenicity of inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine in children due to age and recent previous influenza vaccination

TitleVariability in the immunogenicity of inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine in children due to age and recent previous influenza vaccination
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherInternational Society for Influenza and other Respiratory Virus Diseases (ISIRV).
Citation
The Options for the Control of Influenza VIII Conference, Cape Town, South Africa, 5-10 September 2013. In the Abstract of the Options for the Control of Influenza VIII Conference, 2013, p. 387, abstract no. P2-529 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Annual receipt of trivalent inactivated influenza (TIV) vaccination is recommended for school-age children in some countries. However, there is little data on the variability of the immunogenicity of influenza vaccination in children and how this is affected by their age and recent influenza vaccination history. Materials and Methods: We used data on children in a Hong Kong community-based study who were randomized to receive TIV before the 2009-2010 influenza season. Antibody titers against seasonal and pandemic A(H1N1), seasonal A(H3N2), and two B influenza viruses (B/Brisbane and B/Florida) were measured by hemagglutination inhibition immediately before and 1 month after vaccination (Cowling et al. Clin Infect Dis. 2012). Multivariate regression models were fitted in a Bayesian framework to characterize the distribution of changes in antibody titers following vaccination and update previous findings by considering the correlation between virus strains (Ng et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013). Results: In 452 subjects, statistically significant rises in the geometric means of all antibody titers were observed, with those against the virus strains included in the TIV rising by geometric means of 7.95 to 13.36; those against pandemic A(H1N1) and B/Florida rose by 1.47 and 4.21, respectively. Geometric standard deviations were between 3.76 and 8.41 around the geometric means, with pandemic A(H1N1) showing the least variability in rises. The most closely correlated titer increases were those for the two influenza B viruses, while increases in pandemic A(H1N1) titers were unrelated to any other titer. Being vaccinated in either of the two previous years significantly reduced the increase in seasonal A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) antibody titers, while among children not vaccinated in the previous 2 years, those aged > 9 years experienced significantly higher increases in the influenza B titers than those aged 6-8 years. Conclusions: Increases in antibody titers following vaccination can vary depending on age and vaccination history. Results from our study suggest that humoral antibody response to TIV may be lower in children receiving repeated vaccination, but receipt of TIV induced seroprotection in most subjects.
DescriptionPoster Session: Vaccines
The Abstracts of the Conference is located at: http://optionsviii.controlinfluenza.com/optionsviii/assets/File/Options_VIII_Abstracts_2013.pdf
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/191988

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorPerera, RAPMen_US
dc.contributor.authorFang, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorIp, DKMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-15T07:45:37Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-15T07:45:37Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Options for the Control of Influenza VIII Conference, Cape Town, South Africa, 5-10 September 2013. In the Abstract of the Options for the Control of Influenza VIII Conference, 2013, p. 387, abstract no. P2-529en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/191988-
dc.descriptionPoster Session: Vaccines-
dc.descriptionThe Abstracts of the Conference is located at: http://optionsviii.controlinfluenza.com/optionsviii/assets/File/Options_VIII_Abstracts_2013.pdf-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Annual receipt of trivalent inactivated influenza (TIV) vaccination is recommended for school-age children in some countries. However, there is little data on the variability of the immunogenicity of influenza vaccination in children and how this is affected by their age and recent influenza vaccination history. Materials and Methods: We used data on children in a Hong Kong community-based study who were randomized to receive TIV before the 2009-2010 influenza season. Antibody titers against seasonal and pandemic A(H1N1), seasonal A(H3N2), and two B influenza viruses (B/Brisbane and B/Florida) were measured by hemagglutination inhibition immediately before and 1 month after vaccination (Cowling et al. Clin Infect Dis. 2012). Multivariate regression models were fitted in a Bayesian framework to characterize the distribution of changes in antibody titers following vaccination and update previous findings by considering the correlation between virus strains (Ng et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013). Results: In 452 subjects, statistically significant rises in the geometric means of all antibody titers were observed, with those against the virus strains included in the TIV rising by geometric means of 7.95 to 13.36; those against pandemic A(H1N1) and B/Florida rose by 1.47 and 4.21, respectively. Geometric standard deviations were between 3.76 and 8.41 around the geometric means, with pandemic A(H1N1) showing the least variability in rises. The most closely correlated titer increases were those for the two influenza B viruses, while increases in pandemic A(H1N1) titers were unrelated to any other titer. Being vaccinated in either of the two previous years significantly reduced the increase in seasonal A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) antibody titers, while among children not vaccinated in the previous 2 years, those aged > 9 years experienced significantly higher increases in the influenza B titers than those aged 6-8 years. Conclusions: Increases in antibody titers following vaccination can vary depending on age and vaccination history. Results from our study suggest that humoral antibody response to TIV may be lower in children receiving repeated vaccination, but receipt of TIV induced seroprotection in most subjects.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInternational Society for Influenza and other Respiratory Virus Diseases (ISIRV).en_US
dc.relation.ispartofOptions for the Control of Influenza VIII Conferenceen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleVariability in the immunogenicity of inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine in children due to age and recent previous influenza vaccinationen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailFreeman, G: gfreeman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPerera, RAPM: mahenp@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailFang, J: vickyf@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailIp, DKM: dkmip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityFreeman, G=rp01694en_US
dc.identifier.authorityIp, DKM=rp00256en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros225746en_US
dc.identifier.spage387, abstract no. P2-529-
dc.identifier.epage387, abstract no. P2-529-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US

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