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Conference Paper: Change in tissue microstructure and resting-state functional connectivity in hippocampus during pregnancy

TitleChange in tissue microstructure and resting-state functional connectivity in hippocampus during pregnancy
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherISMRM.
Citation
The 21st Annual Meeting & Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2013), Salt Lake City, UT., 20-26 April 2013. In Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Proceedings, 2013, v. 21, p. 0334 How to Cite?
AbstractPreviously, it was reported that hippocampal dendritic spine density increased during pregnancy. It suggested that this additional neural plasticity facilitated learning and memory. Moreover, it was confirmed that pregnancy improved spatial learning and memory and, reduced anxiety and stress responsiveness. It was documented that these changes are related to hippocampus. Hence, this study investigated the feasibility of utilizing diffusion tensor imaging and resting-state functional connectivity MRI to detect tissue microstructural changes and functional connectivity changes in the hippocampus respectively. The results indicated that pregnancy induced tissue microstructural and functional connectivity changes in the hippocampus. Furthermore, the results suggested that fractional anisotropy changes and functional connectivity changes were correlated and coupled during pregnancy. (Abstract by ISMRM)
DescriptionScientific Session - fMRI Connectivity: Applications
ISMRM Merit Award: Magna cum Laude
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/191634
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, RWen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, LCen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhou, IYen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, EXen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-15T07:14:47Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-15T07:14:47Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 21st Annual Meeting & Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2013), Salt Lake City, UT., 20-26 April 2013. In Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Proceedings, 2013, v. 21, p. 0334en_US
dc.identifier.issn1557-3672-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/191634-
dc.descriptionScientific Session - fMRI Connectivity: Applications-
dc.descriptionISMRM Merit Award: Magna cum Laude-
dc.description.abstractPreviously, it was reported that hippocampal dendritic spine density increased during pregnancy. It suggested that this additional neural plasticity facilitated learning and memory. Moreover, it was confirmed that pregnancy improved spatial learning and memory and, reduced anxiety and stress responsiveness. It was documented that these changes are related to hippocampus. Hence, this study investigated the feasibility of utilizing diffusion tensor imaging and resting-state functional connectivity MRI to detect tissue microstructural changes and functional connectivity changes in the hippocampus respectively. The results indicated that pregnancy induced tissue microstructural and functional connectivity changes in the hippocampus. Furthermore, the results suggested that fractional anisotropy changes and functional connectivity changes were correlated and coupled during pregnancy. (Abstract by ISMRM)-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherISMRM.-
dc.relation.ispartofSociety of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Proceedingsen_US
dc.titleChange in tissue microstructure and resting-state functional connectivity in hippocampus during pregnancyen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhou, IY: iriszhou@eee.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWu, EX: ewu1@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhou, IY=rp01739en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWu, EX=rp00193en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros225988en_US
dc.identifier.volume21-
dc.identifier.spage0334en_US
dc.identifier.epage0334en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US

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