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Article: The Use of the Modal Auxiliaries“Ying應”and“Xu 須”: A Case of the Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region

TitleThe Use of the Modal Auxiliaries“Ying應”and“Xu 須”: A Case of the Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
Authors
KeywordsAuxiliary verbs
Command
Modal auxiliaries
Chinese
Issue Date2011
PublisherInternational Journal of Arts & Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.internationaljournal.org/
Citation
International Journal of Arts & Sciences, 2011, v. 4 n. 10, p. 267-276 How to Cite?
AbstractThe auxiliary verbs 'Ying應” and “Xu須' indicate a command. The person who issues an order normally has absolute authority while the one who receives it should carry it out. These two modal auxiliaries, which are commonly used in regulations and ordinances, convey an imperative tone. While they are almost identical in meaning, they connote different degrees of sternness in different contexts. But such differences may not be immediately recognizable. For example, the change from ' Ying應” and “Xu須” Xu during the drafting of the Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) implies that the draftsmen have noticed the subtle differences between these two words. This paper attempts to study, from a lexical perspective, the evolution of these two terms with special reference to the Basic Law.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190537
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSoo, YCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T15:28:11Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T15:28:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Arts & Sciences, 2011, v. 4 n. 10, p. 267-276en_US
dc.identifier.issn1557-718Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190537-
dc.description.abstractThe auxiliary verbs 'Ying應” and “Xu須' indicate a command. The person who issues an order normally has absolute authority while the one who receives it should carry it out. These two modal auxiliaries, which are commonly used in regulations and ordinances, convey an imperative tone. While they are almost identical in meaning, they connote different degrees of sternness in different contexts. But such differences may not be immediately recognizable. For example, the change from ' Ying應” and “Xu須” Xu during the drafting of the Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) implies that the draftsmen have noticed the subtle differences between these two words. This paper attempts to study, from a lexical perspective, the evolution of these two terms with special reference to the Basic Law.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInternational Journal of Arts & Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.internationaljournal.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Arts & Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectAuxiliary verbsen_US
dc.subjectCommanden_US
dc.subjectModal auxiliariesen_US
dc.subjectChineseen_US
dc.titleThe Use of the Modal Auxiliaries“Ying應”and“Xu 須”: A Case of the Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Regionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSoo, YC: sooyc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.hkuros221499en_US
dc.identifier.volume4en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage267en_US
dc.identifier.epage276en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US

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