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Book Chapter: Science Curriculum Reform on 'Scientific Literacy for All' Across National Contexts: Case Studies of Curricula from England & Wales and Hong Kong

TitleScience Curriculum Reform on 'Scientific Literacy for All' Across National Contexts: Case Studies of Curricula from England & Wales and Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Science Curriculum Reform on 'Scientific Literacy for All' Across National Contexts: Case Studies of Curricula from England & Wales and Hong Kong. In Mansour, N & Wegerif, R (Eds.), Science education for diversity: Theory and practice, p. 179-201. Dordrecht; London: Springer, 2013 How to Cite?
AbstractIn recent years, a wide range of international policy documents has highlighted the significance of scientific literacy for all students in secondary schooling. Curriculum reform efforts have concentrated on the teaching of science as a goal not only for the education of scientists but also for the broader public. In this sense, the ‘Scientific Literacy for All’ slogan has promoted diversity in the form of a range of students targeted for inclusion in scientific practices and ways of thinking. The key premise of these efforts is that in industrialised and democratic societies, the public needs to be better equipped with scientific reasoning skills for informed decision-making as part of active and informed citizenship. A particular aspect of the move for ‘Scientific Literacy for All’ is the inclusion of themes such the understanding of science in context and the nature of science. In this chapter, we will review the key arguments for including scientific literacy in science teaching and learning. We will then focus on case study analyses of secondary science curricula from England and Hong Kong to illustrate in more depth how the rhetoric of ‘Scientific Literacy for All’ is instantiated. The purpose of these analyses is to highlight effective approaches to policy and implementation of scientific literacy in school science. We will draw from classroom-based research projects such as the Mind the Gap and S-TEAM projects in England and the Learning Science series of research and teacher development projects which aim to enhance teacher understanding of NOS and pedagogical skills for teaching NOS in their classrooms in Hong Kong. We will conclude with a set of recommendations for bridging gaps in policy, research and practice, and achieving diversity through engagement in the ‘Scientific Literacy for All’ agenda.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190455
ISBN
Series/Report no.Cultural Studies of Science Education, Vol. 8

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorErduran, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, ASLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T15:23:24Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T15:23:24Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationScience Curriculum Reform on 'Scientific Literacy for All' Across National Contexts: Case Studies of Curricula from England & Wales and Hong Kong. In Mansour, N & Wegerif, R (Eds.), Science education for diversity: Theory and practice, p. 179-201. Dordrecht; London: Springer, 2013en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9789400745636-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190455-
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, a wide range of international policy documents has highlighted the significance of scientific literacy for all students in secondary schooling. Curriculum reform efforts have concentrated on the teaching of science as a goal not only for the education of scientists but also for the broader public. In this sense, the ‘Scientific Literacy for All’ slogan has promoted diversity in the form of a range of students targeted for inclusion in scientific practices and ways of thinking. The key premise of these efforts is that in industrialised and democratic societies, the public needs to be better equipped with scientific reasoning skills for informed decision-making as part of active and informed citizenship. A particular aspect of the move for ‘Scientific Literacy for All’ is the inclusion of themes such the understanding of science in context and the nature of science. In this chapter, we will review the key arguments for including scientific literacy in science teaching and learning. We will then focus on case study analyses of secondary science curricula from England and Hong Kong to illustrate in more depth how the rhetoric of ‘Scientific Literacy for All’ is instantiated. The purpose of these analyses is to highlight effective approaches to policy and implementation of scientific literacy in school science. We will draw from classroom-based research projects such as the Mind the Gap and S-TEAM projects in England and the Learning Science series of research and teacher development projects which aim to enhance teacher understanding of NOS and pedagogical skills for teaching NOS in their classrooms in Hong Kong. We will conclude with a set of recommendations for bridging gaps in policy, research and practice, and achieving diversity through engagement in the ‘Scientific Literacy for All’ agenda.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofScience education for diversity: Theory and practiceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCultural Studies of Science Education, Vol. 8-
dc.titleScience Curriculum Reform on 'Scientific Literacy for All' Across National Contexts: Case Studies of Curricula from England & Wales and Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, ASL: aslwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ASL=rp00972en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-94-007-4563-6_9-
dc.identifier.hkuros222754en_US
dc.identifier.spage179en_US
dc.identifier.epage201en_US
dc.publisher.placeDordrecht; Londonen_US

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