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Conference Paper: On incorrectness in elastic rebound theory for cause of earthquakes

TitleOn incorrectness in elastic rebound theory for cause of earthquakes
Authors
KeywordsEarthquake
Energy
Fault
Heat
Natural gas
Issue Date2013
PublisherICF13.
Citation
The 13th International Conference on Fracture (ICF13), Beijing, China, 16-21 June 2013. In Conference Proceedings, 2013, p. S20-1-S20-10 How to Cite?
AbstractThe elastic rebound theory was developed 100 years ago from the observations of co-seismic surface ruptures induced by the 1906 California Earthquake. It is only partially correct because it associates earthquakes with geological faults. However, it is inconsistent and even violates many other phenomena that were present before, during and after earthquakes. Numerous failures have been encountered and experienced in the tremendous efforts using the elastic rebound theory in the prediction of earthquakes over the past 100 years. Many current seismo-geologist and seismologists have lost their original goals to predict earthquakes and turned to believe that earthquakes are unpredictable with present techniques. All these problems are due to the fact that the incorrect elastic rebound theory for cause of earthquakes was used in the investigation and prediction of earthquakes. The paper also shows that the energy released during earthquake is not the elastic stress and strain energy accumulated in brittle crustal rock solids during relative movements of tectonic plates. The released energy is the volumetric expansion energy of highly compressed and dense natural gas rapidly escaped from its deep crustal traps via fault channels. This gas hypothesis for the cause of earthquakes would make earthquake predicable in the near future.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190291

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYue, QZQen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T15:17:03Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T15:17:03Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th International Conference on Fracture (ICF13), Beijing, China, 16-21 June 2013. In Conference Proceedings, 2013, p. S20-1-S20-10en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190291-
dc.description.abstractThe elastic rebound theory was developed 100 years ago from the observations of co-seismic surface ruptures induced by the 1906 California Earthquake. It is only partially correct because it associates earthquakes with geological faults. However, it is inconsistent and even violates many other phenomena that were present before, during and after earthquakes. Numerous failures have been encountered and experienced in the tremendous efforts using the elastic rebound theory in the prediction of earthquakes over the past 100 years. Many current seismo-geologist and seismologists have lost their original goals to predict earthquakes and turned to believe that earthquakes are unpredictable with present techniques. All these problems are due to the fact that the incorrect elastic rebound theory for cause of earthquakes was used in the investigation and prediction of earthquakes. The paper also shows that the energy released during earthquake is not the elastic stress and strain energy accumulated in brittle crustal rock solids during relative movements of tectonic plates. The released energy is the volumetric expansion energy of highly compressed and dense natural gas rapidly escaped from its deep crustal traps via fault channels. This gas hypothesis for the cause of earthquakes would make earthquake predicable in the near future.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherICF13.-
dc.relation.ispartof13th International Conference on Fracture, ICF13 Proceedingsen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectEarthquake-
dc.subjectEnergy-
dc.subjectFault-
dc.subjectHeat-
dc.subjectNatural gas-
dc.titleOn incorrectness in elastic rebound theory for cause of earthquakesen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailYue, QZQ: yueqzq@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYue, QZQ=rp00209en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros224816en_US
dc.identifier.spageS20-1en_US
dc.identifier.epageS20-10en_US
dc.publisher.placeChinaen_US

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