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Conference Paper: Bimodal affective stimuli do not always enhance infant’s rule learning: congruency and relevance also matter too

TitleBimodal affective stimuli do not always enhance infant’s rule learning: congruency and relevance also matter too
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Ophthalmology and optometry
Issue Date2013
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
The 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Science Society (VSS 2013), Naples, FL., 10-15 May 2013. In Journal of Vision, 2013, v. 13 n. 9, article 738 How to Cite?
AbstractTsui and Tseng (2011) found bimodal presentation of grammar-like rules (AAB) helps 8-10 month preverbal infants to learn otherwise when the rule is presented with visual presentation of emotional cartoon faces alone (happy-upset-happy faces) or auditory presentation of corresponding emotional sounds (laughing-crying-laughing) alone. But bimodal facilitation did not apply when geometry shapes accompanied by recorded syllables. We investigated what constitutes the difference in two experiments. In Experiment 1, we tested whether visual and audio congruency was critical by habituating 15 infants to the same AAB rule with emotional cartoon faces (e.g. happy face) coupled with incongruent emotional sounds (e.g. crying sound). We did not find difference between novel and learnt rules at dis-habituation looking time as learning evidence. In Experiment 2, we tested whether emotional content is essential for bimodal facilitation by employing an emotionless cartoon face speaking syllables to habituate seventeen 8-10-month-olds with the same AAB rule. At dis-habituation, infants looked longer significantly at novel rules (ABB and ABA), demonstrating successful acquisition of the habituated rule. Our results indicate that relevancy and congruency in audio-visual pair both matter to facilitate infants’ abstract rule learning. Syllables associated from a human face are better than when associated with arbitrary visual shapes. Infants’ learning effect is compromised when the emotional congruence of the audio and visual stimuli is reduced. It suggests that an object-based cross-sensory integration occurs before the abstract rule is extracted from bimodal presentation.
DescriptionMeeting abstract presented at VSS 2013
Open Access Journal
Session - Development: Typical development across the lifespan
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190227
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTseng, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorMa, YKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChow, HMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T15:15:53Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T15:15:53Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Science Society (VSS 2013), Naples, FL., 10-15 May 2013. In Journal of Vision, 2013, v. 13 n. 9, article 738en_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190227-
dc.descriptionMeeting abstract presented at VSS 2013-
dc.descriptionOpen Access Journal-
dc.descriptionSession - Development: Typical development across the lifespan-
dc.description.abstractTsui and Tseng (2011) found bimodal presentation of grammar-like rules (AAB) helps 8-10 month preverbal infants to learn otherwise when the rule is presented with visual presentation of emotional cartoon faces alone (happy-upset-happy faces) or auditory presentation of corresponding emotional sounds (laughing-crying-laughing) alone. But bimodal facilitation did not apply when geometry shapes accompanied by recorded syllables. We investigated what constitutes the difference in two experiments. In Experiment 1, we tested whether visual and audio congruency was critical by habituating 15 infants to the same AAB rule with emotional cartoon faces (e.g. happy face) coupled with incongruent emotional sounds (e.g. crying sound). We did not find difference between novel and learnt rules at dis-habituation looking time as learning evidence. In Experiment 2, we tested whether emotional content is essential for bimodal facilitation by employing an emotionless cartoon face speaking syllables to habituate seventeen 8-10-month-olds with the same AAB rule. At dis-habituation, infants looked longer significantly at novel rules (ABB and ABA), demonstrating successful acquisition of the habituated rule. Our results indicate that relevancy and congruency in audio-visual pair both matter to facilitate infants’ abstract rule learning. Syllables associated from a human face are better than when associated with arbitrary visual shapes. Infants’ learning effect is compromised when the emotional congruence of the audio and visual stimuli is reduced. It suggests that an object-based cross-sensory integration occurs before the abstract rule is extracted from bimodal presentation.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectOphthalmology and optometry-
dc.titleBimodal affective stimuli do not always enhance infant’s rule learning: congruency and relevance also matter tooen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailTseng, C: tseng@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTseng, C=rp00640en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/13.9.738-
dc.identifier.hkuros222331en_US
dc.identifier.volume13en_US
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 131029-

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