File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL

Conference Paper: What should be said and what should not be said? − Perception of parents and caregivers of individuals with Down Syndrome in Hong Kong on sensitive language in Cantonese used in healthcare setting

TitleWhat should be said and what should not be said? − Perception of parents and caregivers of individuals with Down Syndrome in Hong Kong on sensitive language in Cantonese used in healthcare setting
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkjpaed.org/index.asp
Citation
The 2013 Joint Annual Scientific Meeting of The Hong Kong Paediatric Society and Hong Kong Paediatric Nurses Association, Hong Kong, 8 September 2013. In Hong Kong Journal of Paediatrics (New series), 2013, v. 18 n. 4, p. 244 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Every word that health professionals said may be heavily valued, making it particularly imperative for us to select word choices appropriately. To our knowledge, there is limited medical linguistics study in Cantonese to date. Down syndrome (DS) is a common genetic and parents of individuals with DS have extensive experience in interacting with health professionals. This current study aims to explore the perception of parents and caregivers of individuals of DS on the language used in healthcare settings in Hong Kong. METHOD: We recruited parents/caregivers of individuals with DS through Hong Kong Down Syndrome Association (HKDSA). Parents/caregivers were invited to complete a questionnaire with words adapted from a study on sensitive language used in genetics (Hodgson et al., 2005). The questionnaire was reviewed critically by the HKDSA scientific committee. Participants were asked to rate each words/phrases as "offensive"/"not offensive", offer alternatives to the words listed and give other words/phrases based on their past experience in healthcare setting which they found as offensive. RESULT: We have recruited 116 parents / caregivers of individuals with DS (age 5-55). Most participants rated " become a burden" (82%), " useless" (77%), " hopeless" (77%) and " abnormal" (76%) as "offensive". Some participants suggested alternative words, such as " special" instead of " become a burden" and " abnormal" respectively. Some participants also gave their other perceived offensive words, such as " Mongols". On the other hand, the least rated "offensive" words are " Chromosome deviant" (35%), " growth delay" (35%) and " handicapped person" (34%). CONCLUSION: Overall, the findings of this study showed that words that were mostly colloquial, dysphemism, or slang commonly used in vernacular speech were rated as offensive by most participants. On the other hand, literary terms were more acceptable. The findings reflect that participants have sensitive impression on the language used in medical setting. This has implication in the practice of genetic counseling. Health professionals should be aware of their choice of language in order to provide support to parents and caregivers of individuals with special needs.
DescriptionPoster Presentation (Doctor’s Session)
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190136
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.194
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.123

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMok, WKYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, WYen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, WHSen_US
dc.contributor.authorIp, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorZayts, OAen_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, BHYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T15:12:12Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T15:12:12Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2013 Joint Annual Scientific Meeting of The Hong Kong Paediatric Society and Hong Kong Paediatric Nurses Association, Hong Kong, 8 September 2013. In Hong Kong Journal of Paediatrics (New series), 2013, v. 18 n. 4, p. 244en_US
dc.identifier.issn1013-9923-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190136-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation (Doctor’s Session)-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Every word that health professionals said may be heavily valued, making it particularly imperative for us to select word choices appropriately. To our knowledge, there is limited medical linguistics study in Cantonese to date. Down syndrome (DS) is a common genetic and parents of individuals with DS have extensive experience in interacting with health professionals. This current study aims to explore the perception of parents and caregivers of individuals of DS on the language used in healthcare settings in Hong Kong. METHOD: We recruited parents/caregivers of individuals with DS through Hong Kong Down Syndrome Association (HKDSA). Parents/caregivers were invited to complete a questionnaire with words adapted from a study on sensitive language used in genetics (Hodgson et al., 2005). The questionnaire was reviewed critically by the HKDSA scientific committee. Participants were asked to rate each words/phrases as "offensive"/"not offensive", offer alternatives to the words listed and give other words/phrases based on their past experience in healthcare setting which they found as offensive. RESULT: We have recruited 116 parents / caregivers of individuals with DS (age 5-55). Most participants rated " become a burden" (82%), " useless" (77%), " hopeless" (77%) and " abnormal" (76%) as "offensive". Some participants suggested alternative words, such as " special" instead of " become a burden" and " abnormal" respectively. Some participants also gave their other perceived offensive words, such as " Mongols". On the other hand, the least rated "offensive" words are " Chromosome deviant" (35%), " growth delay" (35%) and " handicapped person" (34%). CONCLUSION: Overall, the findings of this study showed that words that were mostly colloquial, dysphemism, or slang commonly used in vernacular speech were rated as offensive by most participants. On the other hand, literary terms were more acceptable. The findings reflect that participants have sensitive impression on the language used in medical setting. This has implication in the practice of genetic counseling. Health professionals should be aware of their choice of language in order to provide support to parents and caregivers of individuals with special needs.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkjpaed.org/index.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Journal of Paediatrics (New series)en_US
dc.titleWhat should be said and what should not be said? − Perception of parents and caregivers of individuals with Down Syndrome in Hong Kong on sensitive language in Cantonese used in healthcare settingen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChu, WY: chuwyy@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, WHS: whswong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailIp, P: patricip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailZayts, OA: zayts@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChung, BHY: bhychung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityIp, P=rp01337en_US
dc.identifier.authorityZayts, OA=rp01211en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChung, BHY=rp00473en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros225109en_US
dc.identifier.volume18-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage244en_US
dc.identifier.epage244en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats