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Conference Paper: Age, Education, and Cognitive Decline: a prospective study of cognitive function in community-dwelling Chinese older adults in Hong Kong

TitleAge, Education, and Cognitive Decline: a prospective study of cognitive function in community-dwelling Chinese older adults in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://easap.asia/index.htm
Citation
The 3rd Joint International Conference of the Hong Kong College of Psychiatrists and the Royal College of Psychiatrists (UK), Hong Kong, China, 8-10 December 2012. In East Asian Archives of Psychiatry, 2012, v. 22 suppl. 4, p. 46, abstract no. F2.2.8 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: This study aimed to investigate the changes in cognitive profiles and the effect of age and education on such changes in an older community cohort over a 5-year period. Methods: A random sample of 787 non-demented Chinese elders in Hong Kong was assessed with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery at baseline, in the 2nd and 5th year. Results: A total of 454 subjects were assessed at the 5th year. For subjects with normal cognitive function at baseline, 186 (56.9%) remained cognitively normal, 115 (35.2%) had mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 26 (7.9%) became demented. For subjects with MCI at baseline, 28 (22%) reverted to normal, 59 (46.5%) remained as MCI, 40 (31.5%) became demented. The decline in scores of Cantonese Mini-Mental State Examination was significant over the years, with the rate of decline being greater after the 2nd year. Using logistic regression, age and education had significant predictive effects on the progression to dementia, but the protective effect of education was lost if the subjects were already suffering from MCI at the baseline. Age was a significant factor affecting the cognitive function over time, while the effect of education was lost in the baseline MCI subjects. Conclusions: A decline in cognitive profile took place before the clinical diagnosis of dementia. The protective effect of education on cognitive function appeared to have lost when the person started to have MCI.
DescriptionConference Theme: Mental Health for All
Free Paper 3.1 – Neuroscience and Mental Health
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190122
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.331

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, CHYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GTYen_US
dc.contributor.authorFung, AWTen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, WCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, LCWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T15:11:07Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T15:11:07Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 3rd Joint International Conference of the Hong Kong College of Psychiatrists and the Royal College of Psychiatrists (UK), Hong Kong, China, 8-10 December 2012. In East Asian Archives of Psychiatry, 2012, v. 22 suppl. 4, p. 46, abstract no. F2.2.8en_US
dc.identifier.issn2078-9947-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190122-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Mental Health for All-
dc.descriptionFree Paper 3.1 – Neuroscience and Mental Health-
dc.description.abstractBackground: This study aimed to investigate the changes in cognitive profiles and the effect of age and education on such changes in an older community cohort over a 5-year period. Methods: A random sample of 787 non-demented Chinese elders in Hong Kong was assessed with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery at baseline, in the 2nd and 5th year. Results: A total of 454 subjects were assessed at the 5th year. For subjects with normal cognitive function at baseline, 186 (56.9%) remained cognitively normal, 115 (35.2%) had mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 26 (7.9%) became demented. For subjects with MCI at baseline, 28 (22%) reverted to normal, 59 (46.5%) remained as MCI, 40 (31.5%) became demented. The decline in scores of Cantonese Mini-Mental State Examination was significant over the years, with the rate of decline being greater after the 2nd year. Using logistic regression, age and education had significant predictive effects on the progression to dementia, but the protective effect of education was lost if the subjects were already suffering from MCI at the baseline. Age was a significant factor affecting the cognitive function over time, while the effect of education was lost in the baseline MCI subjects. Conclusions: A decline in cognitive profile took place before the clinical diagnosis of dementia. The protective effect of education on cognitive function appeared to have lost when the person started to have MCI.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://easap.asia/index.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofEast Asian Archives of Psychiatryen_US
dc.rightsEast Asian Archives of Psychiatry. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.titleAge, Education, and Cognitive Decline: a prospective study of cognitive function in community-dwelling Chinese older adults in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, WC: waicchan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, WC=rp01687en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros225229en_US
dc.identifier.volume22-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 4-
dc.identifier.spage46, abstract no. F2.2.8-
dc.identifier.epage46, abstract no. F2.2.8-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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