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Article: Transnational Sacralizations: When Daoist Monks Meet Spiritual Tourists

TitleTransnational Sacralizations: When Daoist Monks Meet Spiritual Tourists
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherTaylor & Francis. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00141844.asp
Citation
Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology, 2014, v. 79 n. 2, p. 169-192 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article examines the production of sacrality in the context of globalization, through the case of encounters between international spiritual tourists and Chinese monks. The sacred mountain of Huashan has historically been localized in the context of Daoist cosmology, Chinese imperial civilizing, socialist nation-building and, now, global capitalism. While the monks experience Huashan as a gateway for embeddedness into Daoist lineage, ritual and cosmology, the spiritual tourists approach it as a fountain of raw, consumable energy on a path of disembedding and individuation. But encounters between the two groups lead to the mutual interference and interpenetration of both trajectories. Undermining dichotomist concepts of the sacred which define it as either essentially Other or as socially constructed and contested, the sacrality of Huashan serves as both an anchor for multiple centralizing projects and forces, and as a catalyst and node for the formation of interconnecting and expanding horizontal networks.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/189428

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, DAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T14:40:37Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T14:40:37Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationEthnos: Journal of Anthropology, 2014, v. 79 n. 2, p. 169-192en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/189428-
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the production of sacrality in the context of globalization, through the case of encounters between international spiritual tourists and Chinese monks. The sacred mountain of Huashan has historically been localized in the context of Daoist cosmology, Chinese imperial civilizing, socialist nation-building and, now, global capitalism. While the monks experience Huashan as a gateway for embeddedness into Daoist lineage, ritual and cosmology, the spiritual tourists approach it as a fountain of raw, consumable energy on a path of disembedding and individuation. But encounters between the two groups lead to the mutual interference and interpenetration of both trajectories. Undermining dichotomist concepts of the sacred which define it as either essentially Other or as socially constructed and contested, the sacrality of Huashan serves as both an anchor for multiple centralizing projects and forces, and as a catalyst and node for the formation of interconnecting and expanding horizontal networks.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00141844.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEthnos: Journal of Anthropologyen_US
dc.rightsPREPRINT This is a preprint of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in the [JOURNAL TITLE] [year of publication] [copyright Taylor & Francis]; [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article POSTPRINT ‘This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the article as published in the print edition of the journal]. [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article.en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleTransnational Sacralizations: When Daoist Monks Meet Spiritual Touristsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPalmer, DA: palmer19@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPalmer, DA=rp00654en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00141844.2012.714396-
dc.identifier.hkuros223669en_US
dc.identifier.volume79-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage169-
dc.identifier.epage192-

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