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Article: From ‘Congregations’ to ‘Small Group Community Building’: Localizing the Bahá’í Faith in Hong Kong, Taiwan and Mainland China

TitleFrom ‘Congregations’ to ‘Small Group Community Building’: Localizing the Bahá’í Faith in Hong Kong, Taiwan and Mainland China
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherM. E. Sharpe.
Citation
Chinese Sociological Review, 2013, v. 45-2, p. 78-98 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the second half of the 20th century, the Bahá’í faith experienced rapid growth in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Consolidating large numbers of new believers into viable communities has presented great challenges to Bahá’í institutions, including in Chinese communities. Since the late 1990's, a new pattern of discourses and practices has emerged with the aim of nurturing a sustainable pattern of Baha’i community building. One aspect of this approach has been a critique of a "congregational" religious culture which implies boundaries between believers and non-believers, leaders and laypersons, and private religiosity and community service. Instead, an approach centred on study, devotion, and action in small groups at the grassroots, is becoming the focus of Bahá’í communities. This article compares the dynamics of small group community building among Bahá’ís in Hong Kong, Taiwan and mainland China, and the evolving relationship between small groups and Bahá’í electoral institutions characterized by practices of “religious citizenship” at the local and global levels. The study illustrates the localization of a global religion in three different Chinese socio-political contexts.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/189427
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, DAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T14:40:37Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T14:40:37Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationChinese Sociological Review, 2013, v. 45-2, p. 78-98en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/189427-
dc.description.abstractIn the second half of the 20th century, the Bahá’í faith experienced rapid growth in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Consolidating large numbers of new believers into viable communities has presented great challenges to Bahá’í institutions, including in Chinese communities. Since the late 1990's, a new pattern of discourses and practices has emerged with the aim of nurturing a sustainable pattern of Baha’i community building. One aspect of this approach has been a critique of a "congregational" religious culture which implies boundaries between believers and non-believers, leaders and laypersons, and private religiosity and community service. Instead, an approach centred on study, devotion, and action in small groups at the grassroots, is becoming the focus of Bahá’í communities. This article compares the dynamics of small group community building among Bahá’ís in Hong Kong, Taiwan and mainland China, and the evolving relationship between small groups and Bahá’í electoral institutions characterized by practices of “religious citizenship” at the local and global levels. The study illustrates the localization of a global religion in three different Chinese socio-political contexts.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherM. E. Sharpe.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofChinese Sociological Reviewen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleFrom ‘Congregations’ to ‘Small Group Community Building’: Localizing the Bahá’í Faith in Hong Kong, Taiwan and Mainland Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPalmer, DA: palmer19@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPalmer, DA=rp00654en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.2753/CSA2162-0555450205-
dc.identifier.hkuros223666en_US
dc.identifier.volume45-2en_US
dc.identifier.spage78en_US
dc.identifier.epage98en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000318370500006-

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