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Article: Estimating the heritability of reporting stressful life events captured by common genetic variants.

TitleEstimating the heritability of reporting stressful life events captured by common genetic variants.
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 2013, v. 43 n. 9, p. 1965-1971 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Although usually thought of as external environmental stressors, a significant heritable component has been reported for measures of stressful life events (SLEs) in twin studies. Method We examined the variance in SLEs captured by common genetic variants from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 2578 individuals. Genome-wide complex trait analysis (GCTA) was used to estimate the phenotypic variance tagged by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We also performed a GWAS on the number of SLEs, and looked at correlations between siblings. RESULTS: A significant proportion of variance in SLEs was captured by SNPs (30%, p = 0.04). When events were divided into those considered to be dependent or independent, an equal amount of variance was explained for both. This 'heritability' was in part confounded by personality measures of neuroticism and psychoticism. A GWAS for the total number of SLEs revealed one SNP that reached genome-wide significance (p = 4 x 10-8), although this association was not replicated in separate samples. Using available sibling data for 744 individuals, we also found a significant positive correlation of R 2 = 0.08 in SLEs (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: These results provide independent validation from molecular data for the heritability of reporting environmental measures, and show that this heritability is in part due to both common variants and the confounding effect of personality.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/189366
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPower, RAen_US
dc.contributor.authorWingenbach, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorCohen-Woods, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorUher, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, MYen_US
dc.contributor.authorButler, WLen_US
dc.contributor.authoret al.,en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T14:37:52Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T14:37:52Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 2013, v. 43 n. 9, p. 1965-1971en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/189366-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Although usually thought of as external environmental stressors, a significant heritable component has been reported for measures of stressful life events (SLEs) in twin studies. Method We examined the variance in SLEs captured by common genetic variants from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 2578 individuals. Genome-wide complex trait analysis (GCTA) was used to estimate the phenotypic variance tagged by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We also performed a GWAS on the number of SLEs, and looked at correlations between siblings. RESULTS: A significant proportion of variance in SLEs was captured by SNPs (30%, p = 0.04). When events were divided into those considered to be dependent or independent, an equal amount of variance was explained for both. This 'heritability' was in part confounded by personality measures of neuroticism and psychoticism. A GWAS for the total number of SLEs revealed one SNP that reached genome-wide significance (p = 4 x 10-8), although this association was not replicated in separate samples. Using available sibling data for 744 individuals, we also found a significant positive correlation of R 2 = 0.08 in SLEs (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: These results provide independent validation from molecular data for the heritability of reporting environmental measures, and show that this heritability is in part due to both common variants and the confounding effect of personality.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicineen_US
dc.rightsPsychological Medicine. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.titleEstimating the heritability of reporting stressful life events captured by common genetic variants.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailButler, WL: wbutler@hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291712002589en_US
dc.identifier.pmid23237013en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros221495en_US
dc.identifier.volume43en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage1965en_US
dc.identifier.epage1971en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000322828600016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US

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