File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Prevalence of and associations with reduced exercise capacity in peritoneal dialysis patients

TitlePrevalence of and associations with reduced exercise capacity in peritoneal dialysis patients
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ajkd
Citation
American journal of kidney diseases, 2013, v. 62 n. 5, p. 939-946 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Exercise capacity is reduced in patients with end-stage renal disease on maintenance home peritoneal dialysis therapy, although the potential mechanisms and clinical implications remain unclear. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING and PARTICIPANTS: 95 ambulatory prevalent and incident peritoneal dialysis patients in a well-established renal dialysis center (mean age, 58.26 +/- 12.6 [SD] years; 63% men; mean duration of peritoneal dialysis therapy, 3.2 +/- 4.1 years). PREDICTOR: Estimated volume status using spectral bioelectrical impedance, echocardiography-derived hemodynamic parameters. OUTCOME: Exercise capacity measured as peak oxygen consumption using symptom-limiting treadmill exercise testing. RESULTS: Exercise capacity was reduced in 96% of patients and severely reduced in 65%. Extracellular to intracellular fluid volume ratio showed the strongest correlation with reduced exercise capacity (R = -0.63; P < 0.001) and was superior to age, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (E:E' ratio), lean tissue mass index, and hemoglobin and albumin levels in predicting exercise intolerance. LIMITATIONS: Relatively small sample size and echocardiogram that was performed only at rest. CONCLUSIONS: There was a strong relationship between body extracellular to intracellular fluid volume ratio and exercise capacity in peritoneal dialysis patients. These findings provide new evidence for a connection between fluid distribution, muscle mass, and exercise capacity. Therapeutic strategies targeting fluid status and muscle mass may improve the exercise capacity of patients on peritoneal dialysis therapy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/189287
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.269
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.313
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZuo, MLen_US
dc.contributor.authorYue, WSen_US
dc.contributor.authorYip, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, KFen_US
dc.contributor.authorYiu, KHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLui, SLen_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, HFen_US
dc.contributor.authorSiu, DCWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, WK-
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T14:31:18Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T14:31:18Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican journal of kidney diseases, 2013, v. 62 n. 5, p. 939-946en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6386-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/189287-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Exercise capacity is reduced in patients with end-stage renal disease on maintenance home peritoneal dialysis therapy, although the potential mechanisms and clinical implications remain unclear. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING and PARTICIPANTS: 95 ambulatory prevalent and incident peritoneal dialysis patients in a well-established renal dialysis center (mean age, 58.26 +/- 12.6 [SD] years; 63% men; mean duration of peritoneal dialysis therapy, 3.2 +/- 4.1 years). PREDICTOR: Estimated volume status using spectral bioelectrical impedance, echocardiography-derived hemodynamic parameters. OUTCOME: Exercise capacity measured as peak oxygen consumption using symptom-limiting treadmill exercise testing. RESULTS: Exercise capacity was reduced in 96% of patients and severely reduced in 65%. Extracellular to intracellular fluid volume ratio showed the strongest correlation with reduced exercise capacity (R = -0.63; P < 0.001) and was superior to age, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (E:E' ratio), lean tissue mass index, and hemoglobin and albumin levels in predicting exercise intolerance. LIMITATIONS: Relatively small sample size and echocardiogram that was performed only at rest. CONCLUSIONS: There was a strong relationship between body extracellular to intracellular fluid volume ratio and exercise capacity in peritoneal dialysis patients. These findings provide new evidence for a connection between fluid distribution, muscle mass, and exercise capacity. Therapeutic strategies targeting fluid status and muscle mass may improve the exercise capacity of patients on peritoneal dialysis therapy.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ajkd-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican journal of kidney diseasesen_US
dc.subject.meshHemodynamics - physiology-
dc.subject.meshKidney Failure, Chronic - physiopathology - therapy-
dc.subject.meshOxygen Consumption - physiology-
dc.subject.meshPeritoneal Dialysis-
dc.subject.meshPhysical Endurance - physiology-
dc.titlePrevalence of and associations with reduced exercise capacity in peritoneal dialysis patientsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZuo, ML: zuoml@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYue, WS: wsyue@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, KF: hrntlkf@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, KH: khkyiu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLui, SL: sllui@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, HF: hftse@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSiu, DCW: cwdsiu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, WK: wkloc@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KF=rp00718en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, KH=rp01490en_US
dc.identifier.authorityTse, HF=rp00428en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1053/j.ajkd.2013.05.016-
dc.identifier.pmid23886613-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84886723915-
dc.identifier.hkuros225198en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros235542-
dc.identifier.volume62-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage939-
dc.identifier.epage946-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000325985600014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats