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Article: Are the kepler near-resonance planet pairs due to tidal dissipation?

TitleAre the kepler near-resonance planet pairs due to tidal dissipation?
Authors
KeywordsCelestial mechanics
Planetary systems
Planets and satellites - general
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe American Astronomical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X/
Citation
The Astrophysical Journal, 2013, v. 774, p. 52:1-52:8 How to Cite?
AbstractThe multiple-planet systems discovered by the Kepler mission show an excess of planet pairs with period ratios just wide of exact commensurability for first-order resonances like 2:1 and 3:2. In principle, these planet pairs could have both resonance angles associated with the resonance librating if the orbital eccentricities are sufficiently small, because the width of first-order resonances diverges in the limit of vanishingly small eccentricity. We consider a widely held scenario in which pairs of planets were captured into first-order resonances by migration due to planet–disk interactions, and subsequently became detached from the resonances, due to tidal dissipation in the planets. In the context of this scenario, we find a constraint on the ratio of the planet’s tidal dissipation function and Love number that implies that some of the Kepler planets are likely solid. However, tides are not strong enough to move many of the planet pairs to the observed separations, suggesting that additional dissipative processes are at play.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/189005
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, MHen_US
dc.contributor.authorFabrycky, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, DNCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T14:23:55Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T14:23:55Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Astrophysical Journal, 2013, v. 774, p. 52:1-52:8en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/189005-
dc.description.abstractThe multiple-planet systems discovered by the Kepler mission show an excess of planet pairs with period ratios just wide of exact commensurability for first-order resonances like 2:1 and 3:2. In principle, these planet pairs could have both resonance angles associated with the resonance librating if the orbital eccentricities are sufficiently small, because the width of first-order resonances diverges in the limit of vanishingly small eccentricity. We consider a widely held scenario in which pairs of planets were captured into first-order resonances by migration due to planet–disk interactions, and subsequently became detached from the resonances, due to tidal dissipation in the planets. In the context of this scenario, we find a constraint on the ratio of the planet’s tidal dissipation function and Love number that implies that some of the Kepler planets are likely solid. However, tides are not strong enough to move many of the planet pairs to the observed separations, suggesting that additional dissipative processes are at play.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe American Astronomical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe Astrophysical Journalen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectCelestial mechanics-
dc.subjectPlanetary systems-
dc.subjectPlanets and satellites - general-
dc.titleAre the kepler near-resonance planet pairs due to tidal dissipation?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, MH: mhlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, MH=rp00724en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/0004-637X/774/1/52-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84882771686-
dc.identifier.hkuros222739en_US
dc.identifier.volume774en_US
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage52:1en_US
dc.identifier.epage52:8en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000323426700052-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 140415-

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