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Article: Issues of design and statistical analysis in controlled clinical acupuncture trials: An analysis of English-language reports from Western journals

TitleIssues of design and statistical analysis in controlled clinical acupuncture trials: An analysis of English-language reports from Western journals
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0277-6715/
Citation
Statistics In Medicine, 2012, v. 31 n. 7, p. 606-618 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To investigate major methods of design and statistical analysis in controlled clinical acupuncture trials published in the West during the past six years (2003-2009) and, based on this analysis, to provide recommendations that address methodological issues and challenges in clinical acupuncture research. Method: PubMed was searched for acupuncture RCTs published in Western journals in English between 2003 and 2009. The keyword used was acupuncture. Results: One hundred and eight qualified reports of acupuncture trials that included more than 30 symptoms/conditions were identified, analyzed, and grouped into efficacy (explanatory), effectiveness (pragmatically beneficial), and other (unspecified) studies. All were randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs). In spite of significant improvement in the quality of acupuncture RCTs in the last 30 years, these reports show that some methodological issues and shortcomings in design and analysis remain. Moreover, the quality of the efficacy studies was not superior to that of the other types of studies. Research design and reporting problems include unclear patient criteria and inadequate practitioner eligibility, inadequate randomization, and blinding, deficiencies in the selection of controls, and improper outcome measurements. The problems in statistical analysis included insufficient sample sizes and power calculations, inadequate handling of missing data and multiple comparisons, and inefficient methods for dealing with repeated measure and cluster data, baseline value adjustment, and confounding issues. Conclusion: Despite recent advancements in acupuncture research, acupuncture RCTs can be improved, and more rigorous research methods should be carefully considered. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188642
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.533
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.811
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShuai, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhou, XHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Xen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:46Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:46Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationStatistics In Medicine, 2012, v. 31 n. 7, p. 606-618en_US
dc.identifier.issn0277-6715en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188642-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To investigate major methods of design and statistical analysis in controlled clinical acupuncture trials published in the West during the past six years (2003-2009) and, based on this analysis, to provide recommendations that address methodological issues and challenges in clinical acupuncture research. Method: PubMed was searched for acupuncture RCTs published in Western journals in English between 2003 and 2009. The keyword used was acupuncture. Results: One hundred and eight qualified reports of acupuncture trials that included more than 30 symptoms/conditions were identified, analyzed, and grouped into efficacy (explanatory), effectiveness (pragmatically beneficial), and other (unspecified) studies. All were randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs). In spite of significant improvement in the quality of acupuncture RCTs in the last 30 years, these reports show that some methodological issues and shortcomings in design and analysis remain. Moreover, the quality of the efficacy studies was not superior to that of the other types of studies. Research design and reporting problems include unclear patient criteria and inadequate practitioner eligibility, inadequate randomization, and blinding, deficiencies in the selection of controls, and improper outcome measurements. The problems in statistical analysis included insufficient sample sizes and power calculations, inadequate handling of missing data and multiple comparisons, and inefficient methods for dealing with repeated measure and cluster data, baseline value adjustment, and confounding issues. Conclusion: Despite recent advancements in acupuncture research, acupuncture RCTs can be improved, and more rigorous research methods should be carefully considered. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0277-6715/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofStatistics in Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Therapy - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshOutcome Assessment (Health Care) - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Selectionen_US
dc.subject.meshRandomized Controlled Trials As Topic - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshResearch Design - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshSample Sizeen_US
dc.titleIssues of design and statistical analysis in controlled clinical acupuncture trials: An analysis of English-language reports from Western journalsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/sim.4034en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21341295-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84858003161en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84858003161&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume31en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage606en_US
dc.identifier.epage618en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000301121900003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShuai, P=6602833373en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, XH=35197392400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, X=37064579700en_US

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