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Article: Perception of Deqi by Chinese and American acupuncturists: A pilot survey

TitlePerception of Deqi by Chinese and American acupuncturists: A pilot survey
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cmjournal.org/home
Citation
Chinese Medicine, 2011, v. 6 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: In acupuncture, deqi is the sensory experience related to clinical efficacy. As the first study taking into account cultural differences on deqi sensation, this pilot survey aims to corroborate the acupuncturists' general experience in clinical practice with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) findings.Methods: Questionnaires were distributed to acupuncturists of TCM (traditional Chinese medicine)hospitals and acupuncturists attending workshops and seminars in the United States and China. Questions covered clinical significance of deqi, patient attitude and the nature of some pain-related sensations elicited by manual needling.Results: 47 out of a total of 86 acupuncturists agreed that dull pain was deqi and over half regarded it beneficial, while sharp pain was non-deqi and harmful instead. The patients' attitude toward deqi sensation showed a difference between US and China. There was no other dimension showing a difference.Conclusion: Results of this pilot survey indicate that the acupuncturists' perception is consistent with our previous fMRI findings. Results showed almost complete agreement that dull pain is considered deqi and beneficial to treatment, while sharp pain is not deqi and harmful. Particularly, dull pain was deqi and was beneficial to treatment whereas sharp pain was not. Patients in China liked the deqi experience whereas those in the US did not. © 2011 Hui et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188626
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.58
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.655
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, KKKSen_US
dc.contributor.authorSporko, TNen_US
dc.contributor.authorVangel, MGen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorFang, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:41Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationChinese Medicine, 2011, v. 6en_US
dc.identifier.issn1749-8546en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188626-
dc.description.abstractBackground: In acupuncture, deqi is the sensory experience related to clinical efficacy. As the first study taking into account cultural differences on deqi sensation, this pilot survey aims to corroborate the acupuncturists' general experience in clinical practice with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) findings.Methods: Questionnaires were distributed to acupuncturists of TCM (traditional Chinese medicine)hospitals and acupuncturists attending workshops and seminars in the United States and China. Questions covered clinical significance of deqi, patient attitude and the nature of some pain-related sensations elicited by manual needling.Results: 47 out of a total of 86 acupuncturists agreed that dull pain was deqi and over half regarded it beneficial, while sharp pain was non-deqi and harmful instead. The patients' attitude toward deqi sensation showed a difference between US and China. There was no other dimension showing a difference.Conclusion: Results of this pilot survey indicate that the acupuncturists' perception is consistent with our previous fMRI findings. Results showed almost complete agreement that dull pain is considered deqi and beneficial to treatment, while sharp pain is not deqi and harmful. Particularly, dull pain was deqi and was beneficial to treatment whereas sharp pain was not. Patients in China liked the deqi experience whereas those in the US did not. © 2011 Hui et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cmjournal.org/homeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofChinese Medicineen_US
dc.titlePerception of Deqi by Chinese and American acupuncturists: A pilot surveyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1749-8546-6-2en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21251312-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78651564014en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78651564014&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume6en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000208722100002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, KKKS=7103304731en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSporko, TN=35976784100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVangel, MG=7004334288en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, M=36945608800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFang, J=26429465800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US

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