File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Paradoxes in acupuncture research: Strategies for moving forward

TitleParadoxes in acupuncture research: Strategies for moving forward
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherHindawi Publishing Corporation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/
Citation
Evidence-Based Complementary And Alternative Medicine, 2011, v. 2011 How to Cite?
AbstractIn November 2007, the Society for Acupuncture Research (SAR) held an international symposium to mark the 10th anniversary of the 1997 NIH Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture. The symposium presentations revealed the considerable maturation of the field of acupuncture research, yet two provocative paradoxes emerged. First, a number of well-designed clinical trials have reported that true acupuncture is superior to usual care, but does not significantly outperform sham acupuncture, findings apparently at odds with traditional theories regarding acupuncture point specificity. Second, although many studies using animal and human experimental models have reported physiological effects that vary as a function of needling parameters (e.g., mode of stimulation) the extent to which these parameters influence therapeutic outcomes in clinical trials is unclear. This White Paper, collaboratively written by the SAR Board of Directors, identifies gaps in knowledge underlying the paradoxes and proposes strategies for their resolution through translational research. We recommend that acupuncture treatments should be studied (1) "top down" as multi-component "whole-system" interventions and (2) "bottom" up as mechanistic studies that focus on understanding how individual treatment components interact and translate into clinical and physiological outcomes. Such a strategy, incorporating considerations of efficacy, effectiveness and qualitative measures, will strengthen the evidence base for such complex interventions as acupuncture. Copyright © 2011 Helene M. Langevin et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188624
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.931
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.615
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLangevin, HMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWayne, PMen_US
dc.contributor.authorMacpherson, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchnyer, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorMilley, RMen_US
dc.contributor.authorNapadow, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorPark, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarris, REen_US
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorSherman, KJen_US
dc.contributor.authorHaramati, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorHammerschlag, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:41Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationEvidence-Based Complementary And Alternative Medicine, 2011, v. 2011en_US
dc.identifier.issn1741-427Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188624-
dc.description.abstractIn November 2007, the Society for Acupuncture Research (SAR) held an international symposium to mark the 10th anniversary of the 1997 NIH Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture. The symposium presentations revealed the considerable maturation of the field of acupuncture research, yet two provocative paradoxes emerged. First, a number of well-designed clinical trials have reported that true acupuncture is superior to usual care, but does not significantly outperform sham acupuncture, findings apparently at odds with traditional theories regarding acupuncture point specificity. Second, although many studies using animal and human experimental models have reported physiological effects that vary as a function of needling parameters (e.g., mode of stimulation) the extent to which these parameters influence therapeutic outcomes in clinical trials is unclear. This White Paper, collaboratively written by the SAR Board of Directors, identifies gaps in knowledge underlying the paradoxes and proposes strategies for their resolution through translational research. We recommend that acupuncture treatments should be studied (1) "top down" as multi-component "whole-system" interventions and (2) "bottom" up as mechanistic studies that focus on understanding how individual treatment components interact and translate into clinical and physiological outcomes. Such a strategy, incorporating considerations of efficacy, effectiveness and qualitative measures, will strengthen the evidence base for such complex interventions as acupuncture. Copyright © 2011 Helene M. Langevin et al.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHindawi Publishing Corporation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEvidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicineen_US
dc.titleParadoxes in acupuncture research: Strategies for moving forwarden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2011/180805en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78349276967en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78349276967&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume2011en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293303000001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLangevin, HM=6701818924en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWayne, PM=6603905667en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMacPherson, H=7006062923en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchnyer, R=6506347491en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMilley, RM=24923525400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNapadow, V=6602462464en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPark, J=15036293500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHarris, RE=26221232000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCohen, M=9043991700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSherman, KJ=7102452634en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHaramati, A=7003657602en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHammerschlag, R=7005657254en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats