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Article: Meta-analysis: Acupuncture for osteoarthritis of the knee

TitleMeta-analysis: Acupuncture for osteoarthritis of the knee
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherAmerican College of Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.annals.org
Citation
Annals Of Internal Medicine, 2007, v. 146 n. 12, p. 868-877 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Knee osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and functional limitation. Purpose: To evaluate the effects of acupuncture for treating knee osteoarthritis. Data Sources: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases to January 2007. No language restrictions were applied. Study Selection: Randomized trials longer than 6 weeks in duration that compared needle acupuncture with a sham, usual care, or waiting list control group for patients with knee osteoarthritis. Data Extraction: Two authors independently agreed on eligibility, assessed methodological quality and acupuncture adequacy, and extracted outcome data on pain and function measures. Data Synthesis: Eleven trials met the selection criteria, and 9 reported sufficient data for pooling. Standardized mean differences were calculated by using differences in improvements from baseline between patients assigned to acupuncture and those assigned to control groups. Compared with patients in waiting list control groups, patients who received acupuncture reported clinically relevant short-term improvements in pain (standardized mean difference, -0.96 [95% CI, -1.21 to -0.70]) and function (standardized mean difference, -0.93 [CI, -1.16 to -0.69]). Patients who received acupuncture also reported clinically relevant short- and long-term improvements in pain and function compared with patients in usual care control groups. Compared with a sham control, acupuncture provided clinically irrelevant short-term improvements in pain (standardized mean difference, -0.35 [CI, -0.55 to -0.15]) and function (standardized mean difference, -0.35 [CI, -0.56 to -0.14]) and clinically irrelevant long-term improvements in pain (standardized mean difference, -0.13 [CI, -0.24 to -0.01]) and function (standardized mean difference, -0.14 [CI, -0.26 to -0.03]). Limitation: Sham-controlled trials had heterogeneous results that were probably due to the variability of acupuncture and sham protocols, patient samples, and settings. Conclusions: Sham-controlled trials show clinically irrelevant short-term benefits of acupuncture for treating knee osteoarthritis. Waiting list-controlled trials suggest clinically relevant benefits, some of which may be due to placebo or expectation effects. © 2007 American College of Physicians.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188587
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 16.44
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.378
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorManheimer, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorLinde, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorBouter, LMen_US
dc.contributor.authorBerman, BMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:27Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:27Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Internal Medicine, 2007, v. 146 n. 12, p. 868-877en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-4819en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188587-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Knee osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and functional limitation. Purpose: To evaluate the effects of acupuncture for treating knee osteoarthritis. Data Sources: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases to January 2007. No language restrictions were applied. Study Selection: Randomized trials longer than 6 weeks in duration that compared needle acupuncture with a sham, usual care, or waiting list control group for patients with knee osteoarthritis. Data Extraction: Two authors independently agreed on eligibility, assessed methodological quality and acupuncture adequacy, and extracted outcome data on pain and function measures. Data Synthesis: Eleven trials met the selection criteria, and 9 reported sufficient data for pooling. Standardized mean differences were calculated by using differences in improvements from baseline between patients assigned to acupuncture and those assigned to control groups. Compared with patients in waiting list control groups, patients who received acupuncture reported clinically relevant short-term improvements in pain (standardized mean difference, -0.96 [95% CI, -1.21 to -0.70]) and function (standardized mean difference, -0.93 [CI, -1.16 to -0.69]). Patients who received acupuncture also reported clinically relevant short- and long-term improvements in pain and function compared with patients in usual care control groups. Compared with a sham control, acupuncture provided clinically irrelevant short-term improvements in pain (standardized mean difference, -0.35 [CI, -0.55 to -0.15]) and function (standardized mean difference, -0.35 [CI, -0.56 to -0.14]) and clinically irrelevant long-term improvements in pain (standardized mean difference, -0.13 [CI, -0.24 to -0.01]) and function (standardized mean difference, -0.14 [CI, -0.26 to -0.03]). Limitation: Sham-controlled trials had heterogeneous results that were probably due to the variability of acupuncture and sham protocols, patient samples, and settings. Conclusions: Sham-controlled trials show clinically irrelevant short-term benefits of acupuncture for treating knee osteoarthritis. Waiting list-controlled trials suggest clinically relevant benefits, some of which may be due to placebo or expectation effects. © 2007 American College of Physicians.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican College of Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.annals.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Internal Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Therapy - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshOsteoarthritis, Knee - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshPain Managementen_US
dc.subject.meshWaiting Listsen_US
dc.titleMeta-analysis: Acupuncture for osteoarthritis of the kneeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid17577006-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34347398938en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34347398938&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume146en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage868en_US
dc.identifier.epage877en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000247347100005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridManheimer, E=6602167853en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLinde, K=7005058545en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBouter, LM=7102044864en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBerman, BM=35458606800en_US

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