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Article: An infrared radiation study of the biophysical characteristics of traditional moxibustion

TitleAn infrared radiation study of the biophysical characteristics of traditional moxibustion
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/issn/09652299
Citation
Complementary Therapies In Medicine, 2006, v. 14 n. 3, p. 213-219 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: Moxibustion has been a part of acupuncture practice for thousands of years. Traditionally, it includes direct moxibustion, in which moxa sticks are burned at acupuncture points on the skin, and indirect moxibustion, in which monkshood cakes or ginger or garlic slices are used to insulate the skin from burning moxa cones. Recently randomised clinical trials and clinical observations suggest that moxibustion can enhance physiological and immune functions, but there has been little investigation of the scientific basis of these traditional techniques. The present study compared the infrared radiation caused by these techniques to that of non-specific controls and to that of the human body surface at an acupuncture point. Methods: A highly sensitive, infrared-spectrum detection device was used to compare the spectra of traditional moxibustion materials (n = 4/group) with those of control materials (n = 4/group) and to the spectrum at the surface of an acupuncture point LI 4 (Hegu) in healthy volunteers (n = 7). Results: (1)The infrared radiation intensity produced by a traditional moxa stick was 43300.41 mV, with a peak on the infrared spectrum of 3.5 μm, while the respective radiation intensities of two controls, a smokeless moxa stick and a 555 cigarette, were 31.15 mV and 37.03 mV with peaks of 7 μm and 3.5 μm.(2)The infrared radiation intensities of the three traditional media of indirect moxibustion, monkshood cake, ginger slices and garlic slices, were 520.27 mV, 594.79 mV and 681.87 mV, respectively, all with peaks around 7.5 μm and similar spectra. In contrast, the infrared radiation intensities of slices of cucumber and carrot, used as control media for indirect moxibustion, were 274.47 mV and 50.53 mV, respectively, substantially different from those of the traditional media.(3)Infrared radiation at LI 4 (Hegu) was 20.40 mV, and peaked on the infrared spectrum at about 7.5 μm. The experiment showed that the thermal action of the traditional moxa stick was more potent than that of indirect moxibustion and its radiation peak was different from that at the acupuncture point on the human body. In contrast, the thermal action of traditional indirect moxibustion was modest and its radiation peak matched that at the acupuncture point. Conclusion: Direct moxibustion with a traditional moxa stick may produce its potent therapeutic effects by thermal action, while traditional indirect moxibustion may act by producing modest thermal action and a sympathetic vibration at the skin surface. Non-traditional thermal materials and media may not be suitable substitutes for traditional materials. The data provide a scientific, biophysical rationale for traditional moxibustion. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188584
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.935
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.649
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShen, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorDing, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorWei, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorDeng, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:26Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:26Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationComplementary Therapies In Medicine, 2006, v. 14 n. 3, p. 213-219en_US
dc.identifier.issn0965-2299en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188584-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Moxibustion has been a part of acupuncture practice for thousands of years. Traditionally, it includes direct moxibustion, in which moxa sticks are burned at acupuncture points on the skin, and indirect moxibustion, in which monkshood cakes or ginger or garlic slices are used to insulate the skin from burning moxa cones. Recently randomised clinical trials and clinical observations suggest that moxibustion can enhance physiological and immune functions, but there has been little investigation of the scientific basis of these traditional techniques. The present study compared the infrared radiation caused by these techniques to that of non-specific controls and to that of the human body surface at an acupuncture point. Methods: A highly sensitive, infrared-spectrum detection device was used to compare the spectra of traditional moxibustion materials (n = 4/group) with those of control materials (n = 4/group) and to the spectrum at the surface of an acupuncture point LI 4 (Hegu) in healthy volunteers (n = 7). Results: (1)The infrared radiation intensity produced by a traditional moxa stick was 43300.41 mV, with a peak on the infrared spectrum of 3.5 μm, while the respective radiation intensities of two controls, a smokeless moxa stick and a 555 cigarette, were 31.15 mV and 37.03 mV with peaks of 7 μm and 3.5 μm.(2)The infrared radiation intensities of the three traditional media of indirect moxibustion, monkshood cake, ginger slices and garlic slices, were 520.27 mV, 594.79 mV and 681.87 mV, respectively, all with peaks around 7.5 μm and similar spectra. In contrast, the infrared radiation intensities of slices of cucumber and carrot, used as control media for indirect moxibustion, were 274.47 mV and 50.53 mV, respectively, substantially different from those of the traditional media.(3)Infrared radiation at LI 4 (Hegu) was 20.40 mV, and peaked on the infrared spectrum at about 7.5 μm. The experiment showed that the thermal action of the traditional moxa stick was more potent than that of indirect moxibustion and its radiation peak was different from that at the acupuncture point on the human body. In contrast, the thermal action of traditional indirect moxibustion was modest and its radiation peak matched that at the acupuncture point. Conclusion: Direct moxibustion with a traditional moxa stick may produce its potent therapeutic effects by thermal action, while traditional indirect moxibustion may act by producing modest thermal action and a sympathetic vibration at the skin surface. Non-traditional thermal materials and media may not be suitable substitutes for traditional materials. The data provide a scientific, biophysical rationale for traditional moxibustion. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/issn/09652299en_US
dc.relation.ispartofComplementary Therapies in Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshArtemisiaen_US
dc.subject.meshBiophysical Phenomenaen_US
dc.subject.meshBiophysicsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfrared Raysen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMoxibustionen_US
dc.subject.meshSpectrophotometry, Infrareden_US
dc.titleAn infrared radiation study of the biophysical characteristics of traditional moxibustionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ctim.2005.09.003en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16911902-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33746873753en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33746873753&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage213en_US
dc.identifier.epage219en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000240357500007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShen, X=7402721090en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDing, G=7201791850en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, J=13605421900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhao, L=55493563400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, Y=7405367700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDeng, H=14059741900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US

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