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Article: Acupuncture-point stimulation for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

TitleAcupuncture-point stimulation for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherAmerican Society of Clinical Oncology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jco.org/
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Oncology, 2005, v. 23 n. 28, p. 7188-7198 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: Assess the effectiveness of acupuncture-point stimulation on acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Randomized trials of acupuncture-point stimulation by needles, electrical stimulation, magnets, or acupressure were retrieved. Data were provided by investigators of the original trials and pooled using a fixed-effects model. Results: Eleven trials (N = 1,247) were pooled. Overall, acupuncture-point stimulation reduced the proportion of acute vomiting (relative risks [RR] = 0.82; 95% Cl, 0.69 to 0.99; P = .04), but not the mean number of acute emetic episodes or acute or delayed nausea severity compared with controls. By modality, stimulation with needles reduced the proportion of acute vomiting (RR = 0.74; 95% Cl, 0.58 to 0.94; P = .01), but not acute nausea severity. Electroacupuncture reduced the proportion of acute vomiting (RR = 0.76; 95% Cl, 0.60 to 0.97; P = .02), but manual acupuncture did not; delayed symptoms were not reported. Acupressure reduced mean acute nausea severity (standardized mean difference = -0.19; 95% Cl, -0.38 to -0.01 ; P = .03) and most severe acute nausea, but not acute vomiting or delayed symptoms. Noninvasive electrostimulation showed no benefit for any outcome. All trials used concomitant pharmacologic antiemetics, and all, except electroacupuncture trials, used state-of-the-art antiemetics. Conclusion: This review complements data on postoperative nausea and vomiting, suggesting a biologic effect of acupuncture-point stimulation. Electroacupuncture has demonstrated benefit for chemotherapy-induced acute vomiting, but studies with state-of-the-art antiemetics as well as studies for refractory symptoms are needed to determine clinical relevance. Acupressure seems to reduce chemotherapy-induced acute nausea severity, though studies did not involve a placebo control. Noninvasive electrostimulation seems unlikely to have a clinically relevant impact when patients are given state-of-the-art pharmacologie antiemetic therapy. © 2005 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188576
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 20.982
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 9.204
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEzzo, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorVickers, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, MAen_US
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorDibble, SLen_US
dc.contributor.authorIssell, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorPearl, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorRamirez, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoscoe, JAen_US
dc.contributor.authorShen, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorShivnan, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorStreitberger, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorTreish, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Gen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:24Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:24Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Oncology, 2005, v. 23 n. 28, p. 7188-7198en_US
dc.identifier.issn0732-183Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188576-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Assess the effectiveness of acupuncture-point stimulation on acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Randomized trials of acupuncture-point stimulation by needles, electrical stimulation, magnets, or acupressure were retrieved. Data were provided by investigators of the original trials and pooled using a fixed-effects model. Results: Eleven trials (N = 1,247) were pooled. Overall, acupuncture-point stimulation reduced the proportion of acute vomiting (relative risks [RR] = 0.82; 95% Cl, 0.69 to 0.99; P = .04), but not the mean number of acute emetic episodes or acute or delayed nausea severity compared with controls. By modality, stimulation with needles reduced the proportion of acute vomiting (RR = 0.74; 95% Cl, 0.58 to 0.94; P = .01), but not acute nausea severity. Electroacupuncture reduced the proportion of acute vomiting (RR = 0.76; 95% Cl, 0.60 to 0.97; P = .02), but manual acupuncture did not; delayed symptoms were not reported. Acupressure reduced mean acute nausea severity (standardized mean difference = -0.19; 95% Cl, -0.38 to -0.01 ; P = .03) and most severe acute nausea, but not acute vomiting or delayed symptoms. Noninvasive electrostimulation showed no benefit for any outcome. All trials used concomitant pharmacologic antiemetics, and all, except electroacupuncture trials, used state-of-the-art antiemetics. Conclusion: This review complements data on postoperative nausea and vomiting, suggesting a biologic effect of acupuncture-point stimulation. Electroacupuncture has demonstrated benefit for chemotherapy-induced acute vomiting, but studies with state-of-the-art antiemetics as well as studies for refractory symptoms are needed to determine clinical relevance. Acupressure seems to reduce chemotherapy-induced acute nausea severity, though studies did not involve a placebo control. Noninvasive electrostimulation seems unlikely to have a clinically relevant impact when patients are given state-of-the-art pharmacologie antiemetic therapy. © 2005 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Clinical Oncology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jco.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Oncologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Pointsen_US
dc.subject.meshAcute Diseaseen_US
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshElectric Stimulation Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshNausea - Chemically Induced - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms - Drug Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshRandomized Controlled Trials As Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.subject.meshVomiting, Anticipatory - Etiology - Therapyen_US
dc.titleAcupuncture-point stimulation for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomitingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1200/JCO.2005.06.028en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16192603en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-27244433464en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-27244433464&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume23en_US
dc.identifier.issue28en_US
dc.identifier.spage7188en_US
dc.identifier.epage7198en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000232232000047-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEzzo, J=6701568225en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVickers, A=35417733500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRichardson, MA=35596470500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAllen, C=55057683300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDibble, SL=7004325448en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIssell, B=6603735418en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPearl, M=7005756045en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRamirez, G=7101902444en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRoscoe, JA=7006291484en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShen, J=7404930884en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShivnan, J=36832885900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStreitberger, K=6603578309en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTreish, I=6506966195en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, G=7405269023en_US

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