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Article: Effectiveness of acupuncture as adjunctive therapy in osteoarthritis of the knee. A randomized, controlled trial

TitleEffectiveness of acupuncture as adjunctive therapy in osteoarthritis of the knee. A randomized, controlled trial
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherAmerican College of Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.annals.org
Citation
Annals Of Internal Medicine, 2004, v. 141 n. 12, p. 901-910+I-20 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Evidence on the efficacy of acupuncture for reducing the pain and dysfunction of osteoarthritis is equivocal. Objective: To determine whether acupuncture provides greater pain relief and improved function compared with sham acupuncture or education in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Design: Randomized, controlled trial. Setting: Two outpatient clinics (an integrative medicine facility and a rheumatology facility) located in academic teaching hospitals and 1 clinical trials facility. Patients: 570 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee (mean age [±SD], 65.5 ± 8.4 years). Intervention: 23 true acupuncture sessions over 26 weeks. Controls received 6 two-hour sessions over 12 weeks or 23 sham acupuncture sessions over 26 weeks. Measurements: Primary outcomes were changes in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain and function scores at 8 and 26 weeks. Secondary outcomes were patient global assessment, 6-minute walk distance, and physical health scores of the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results: Participants in the true acupuncture group experienced greater improvement in WOMAC function scores than the sham acupuncture group at 8 weeks (mean difference, -2.9 [95% CI, -5.0 to -0.8]; P = 0.01) but not in WOMAC pain score (mean difference, -0.5 [CI, -1.2 to 0.2]; P = 0.18) or the patient global assessment (mean difference, 0.16 [CI, -0.02 to 0.34]; P > 0.2). At 26 weeks, the true acupuncture group experienced significantly greater improvement than the sham group in the WOMAC function score (mean difference, -2.5 [CI, -4.7 to -0.4]; P = 0.01), WOMAC pain score (mean difference, -0.87 [CI, -1.58 to -0.16]; P = 0.003), and patient global assessment (mean difference, 0.26 [CI, 0.07 to 0.45]; P = 0.02). Limitations: At 26 weeks, 43% of the participants in the education group and 25% in each of the true and sham acupuncture groups were not available for analysis. Conclusions: Acupuncture seems to provide improvement in function and pain relief as an adjunctive therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee when compared with credible sham acupuncture and education control groups.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188570
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 16.44
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.378
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBerman, BMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorLangenberg, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, WLen_US
dc.contributor.authorGilpin, AMKen_US
dc.contributor.authorHochberg, MCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:20Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:20Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Internal Medicine, 2004, v. 141 n. 12, p. 901-910+I-20en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-4819en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188570-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Evidence on the efficacy of acupuncture for reducing the pain and dysfunction of osteoarthritis is equivocal. Objective: To determine whether acupuncture provides greater pain relief and improved function compared with sham acupuncture or education in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Design: Randomized, controlled trial. Setting: Two outpatient clinics (an integrative medicine facility and a rheumatology facility) located in academic teaching hospitals and 1 clinical trials facility. Patients: 570 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee (mean age [±SD], 65.5 ± 8.4 years). Intervention: 23 true acupuncture sessions over 26 weeks. Controls received 6 two-hour sessions over 12 weeks or 23 sham acupuncture sessions over 26 weeks. Measurements: Primary outcomes were changes in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain and function scores at 8 and 26 weeks. Secondary outcomes were patient global assessment, 6-minute walk distance, and physical health scores of the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results: Participants in the true acupuncture group experienced greater improvement in WOMAC function scores than the sham acupuncture group at 8 weeks (mean difference, -2.9 [95% CI, -5.0 to -0.8]; P = 0.01) but not in WOMAC pain score (mean difference, -0.5 [CI, -1.2 to 0.2]; P = 0.18) or the patient global assessment (mean difference, 0.16 [CI, -0.02 to 0.34]; P > 0.2). At 26 weeks, the true acupuncture group experienced significantly greater improvement than the sham group in the WOMAC function score (mean difference, -2.5 [CI, -4.7 to -0.4]; P = 0.01), WOMAC pain score (mean difference, -0.87 [CI, -1.58 to -0.16]; P = 0.003), and patient global assessment (mean difference, 0.26 [CI, 0.07 to 0.45]; P = 0.02). Limitations: At 26 weeks, 43% of the participants in the education group and 25% in each of the true and sham acupuncture groups were not available for analysis. Conclusions: Acupuncture seems to provide improvement in function and pain relief as an adjunctive therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee when compared with credible sham acupuncture and education control groups.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican College of Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.annals.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Internal Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshCombined Modality Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOsteoarthritis, Knee - Complications - Physiopathology - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshPain - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPain Managementen_US
dc.subject.meshPain Measurementen_US
dc.subject.meshRecovery Of Function - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titleEffectiveness of acupuncture as adjunctive therapy in osteoarthritis of the knee. A randomized, controlled trialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid15611487-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-19944413048en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-19944413048&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume141en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage901en_US
dc.identifier.epage910+Ien_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBerman, BM=35458606800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLangenberg, P=7005274315en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, WL=7407085578en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGilpin, AMK=36916134300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHochberg, MC=7202565737en_US

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