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Article: Acupuncture and dry-needling for low back pain: An updated systematic review within the framework of the cochrane collaboration

TitleAcupuncture and dry-needling for low back pain: An updated systematic review within the framework of the cochrane collaboration
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.com
Citation
Spine, 2005, v. 30 n. 8, p. 944-963 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives. To assess the effects of acupuncture and dry-needling for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Background. Low back pain is usually a self-limiting condition that tends to improve spontaneously over time. However, for many people, back pain becomes a chronic or recurrent problem for which a large variety of therapeutic interventions are employed. Search strategy. We updated the searches from 1996 to February 2003 in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE. We also searched the Chinese Cochrane Centre database of clinical trials and Japanese databases to February 2003. Selection Criteria. Randomized controlled trials of acupuncture (that involved needling) or dry-needling for adults with nonspecific acute/subacute or chronic low back pain. Data Collection and Analysis. Two reviewers independently assessed methodologic quality (using the criteria recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group) and extracted data. The trials were combined using meta-analysis methods or levels of evidence when the data reported did not allow statistical pooling. Results. Thirty-five randomized clinical trials were included: 20 were published in English, 7 in Japanese, 5 in Chinese, and 1 each in Norwegian, Polish, and German. There were only 3 trials of acupuncture for acute low back pain. These studies did not justify firm conclusions because of their small sample sizes and low methodologic quality. For chronic low back pain, there is evidence of pain relief and functional improvement for acupuncture compared to no treatment or sham therapy. These effects were only observed immediately after the end of the sessions and in short-term follow-up. There is also evidence that acupuncture, added to other conventional therapies, relieves pain and improves function better than the conventional therapies alone. However, the effects are onlysmall. Dry-needling appears to be a useful adjunct to other therapies for chronic low back pain. No clear recommendations could be made about the most effective acupuncture technique. Conclusions. The data do not allow firm conclusions regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute low back pain. For chronic low back pain, acupuncture is more effective for pain relief and functional improvement then no treatment or sham treatment immediately after treatment and in the short-term only. Acupuncture is not more effective than other conventional and "alternative" treatments. The data suggest that acupuncture and dry-needling may be useful adjuncts to other therapies for chronic low back pain. Because most of the studies were of lower methodologic quality, there is a clear need for higher quality trials in this area. ©2005, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188565
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.439
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.459
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFurlan, ADen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Tulder, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorCherkin, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorTsukayama, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorKoes, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorBerman, Ben_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:18Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:18Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationSpine, 2005, v. 30 n. 8, p. 944-963en_US
dc.identifier.issn0362-2436en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188565-
dc.description.abstractObjectives. To assess the effects of acupuncture and dry-needling for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Background. Low back pain is usually a self-limiting condition that tends to improve spontaneously over time. However, for many people, back pain becomes a chronic or recurrent problem for which a large variety of therapeutic interventions are employed. Search strategy. We updated the searches from 1996 to February 2003 in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE. We also searched the Chinese Cochrane Centre database of clinical trials and Japanese databases to February 2003. Selection Criteria. Randomized controlled trials of acupuncture (that involved needling) or dry-needling for adults with nonspecific acute/subacute or chronic low back pain. Data Collection and Analysis. Two reviewers independently assessed methodologic quality (using the criteria recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group) and extracted data. The trials were combined using meta-analysis methods or levels of evidence when the data reported did not allow statistical pooling. Results. Thirty-five randomized clinical trials were included: 20 were published in English, 7 in Japanese, 5 in Chinese, and 1 each in Norwegian, Polish, and German. There were only 3 trials of acupuncture for acute low back pain. These studies did not justify firm conclusions because of their small sample sizes and low methodologic quality. For chronic low back pain, there is evidence of pain relief and functional improvement for acupuncture compared to no treatment or sham therapy. These effects were only observed immediately after the end of the sessions and in short-term follow-up. There is also evidence that acupuncture, added to other conventional therapies, relieves pain and improves function better than the conventional therapies alone. However, the effects are onlysmall. Dry-needling appears to be a useful adjunct to other therapies for chronic low back pain. No clear recommendations could be made about the most effective acupuncture technique. Conclusions. The data do not allow firm conclusions regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute low back pain. For chronic low back pain, acupuncture is more effective for pain relief and functional improvement then no treatment or sham treatment immediately after treatment and in the short-term only. Acupuncture is not more effective than other conventional and "alternative" treatments. The data suggest that acupuncture and dry-needling may be useful adjuncts to other therapies for chronic low back pain. Because most of the studies were of lower methodologic quality, there is a clear need for higher quality trials in this area. ©2005, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSpineen_US
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Therapy - Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLow Back Pain - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshRandomized Controlled Trials As Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titleAcupuncture and dry-needling for low back pain: An updated systematic review within the framework of the cochrane collaborationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.brs.0000158941.21571.01en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15834340-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-18244362053en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-18244362053&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume30en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage944en_US
dc.identifier.epage963en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000228473400016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFurlan, AD=7103131874en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan Tulder, M=7004580975en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCherkin, D=7006291449en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsukayama, H=6602821325en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKoes, B=7006794878en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBerman, B=35458606800en_US

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