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Article: Electroacupuncture attenuates inflammation in a rat model

TitleElectroacupuncture attenuates inflammation in a rat model
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/acm
Citation
Journal Of Alternative And Complementary Medicine, 2005, v. 11 n. 1, p. 135-142 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Acupuncture has traditionally been used in China and is being increasingly applied in Western countries to treat a variety of conditions, including inflammatory disease. However, clinical trials investigating the effectiveness of the anti-inflammatory effects of acupuncture have yielded inconsistent results, and the underlying mechanisms of acupuncture-produced anti-inflammation are unclear. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of electroacupuncture (EA) on inflammation in a rat model. Materials and methods: Four experiments were conducted on male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8-9 per group). Inflammation was induced by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) subcutaneously into the plantar surface of one hind paw of the rat. Experiment 1: To determine the effect of EA (10 and 100 Hz) versus sham treatment on inflammation. Experiment 2: To investigate the involvement of the adrenal glands on the effect of EA treatment using adrenalectomized (ADX) rats. Experiment 3: To determine the effects of EA on plasma levels of corticosterone. Experiment 4: To determine the effects of EA treatment versus immobilization on such stress indicators as heart rate and blood pressure. Results: At 10 Hz EA significantly reduced CFA-induced hind paw edema. The effect was partially blocked in the ADX rats. EA significantly increased plasma levels of corticosterone but produced no noticeable signs of stress. Conclusion: At 10 Hz but not 100 Hz, EA suppresses inflammation by activating the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) and the nervous system. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188559
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.395
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.475
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, RXen_US
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorFan, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorRen, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorBerman, BMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:16Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:16Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Alternative And Complementary Medicine, 2005, v. 11 n. 1, p. 135-142en_US
dc.identifier.issn1075-5535en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188559-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Acupuncture has traditionally been used in China and is being increasingly applied in Western countries to treat a variety of conditions, including inflammatory disease. However, clinical trials investigating the effectiveness of the anti-inflammatory effects of acupuncture have yielded inconsistent results, and the underlying mechanisms of acupuncture-produced anti-inflammation are unclear. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of electroacupuncture (EA) on inflammation in a rat model. Materials and methods: Four experiments were conducted on male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8-9 per group). Inflammation was induced by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) subcutaneously into the plantar surface of one hind paw of the rat. Experiment 1: To determine the effect of EA (10 and 100 Hz) versus sham treatment on inflammation. Experiment 2: To investigate the involvement of the adrenal glands on the effect of EA treatment using adrenalectomized (ADX) rats. Experiment 3: To determine the effects of EA on plasma levels of corticosterone. Experiment 4: To determine the effects of EA treatment versus immobilization on such stress indicators as heart rate and blood pressure. Results: At 10 Hz EA significantly reduced CFA-induced hind paw edema. The effect was partially blocked in the ADX rats. EA significantly increased plasma levels of corticosterone but produced no noticeable signs of stress. Conclusion: At 10 Hz but not 100 Hz, EA suppresses inflammation by activating the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) and the nervous system. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/acmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Alternative and Complementary Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Varianceen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshDisease Models, Animalen_US
dc.subject.meshElectroacupuncture - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshEnzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assayen_US
dc.subject.meshFreund's Adjuvanten_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshNeurogenic Inflammation - Chemically Induced - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshPain - Chemically Induceden_US
dc.subject.meshPain Managementen_US
dc.subject.meshPituitary-Adrenal System - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Sprague-Dawleyen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.titleElectroacupuncture attenuates inflammation in a rat modelen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/acm.2005.11.135en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15750372-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-14744268119en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-14744268119&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage135en_US
dc.identifier.epage142en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000227477300019-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, RX=7404864527en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, X=7501857339en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, A=7005672886en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, L=9036448600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRen, K=7102272533en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBerman, BM=35458606800en_US

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