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Article: Is acupuncture analgesia an expectancy effect? Preliminary evidence based on participants' perceived assignments in two placebo-controlled trials

TitleIs acupuncture analgesia an expectancy effect? Preliminary evidence based on participants' perceived assignments in two placebo-controlled trials
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=9864
Citation
Evaluation And The Health Professions, 2005, v. 28 n. 1, p. 9-26 How to Cite?
AbstractThis purpose of this article is to contrast the analgesic efficacy of acupuncture following dental surgery with the analgesic effects based on the expectation of benefit in two independently conducted placebo-controlled trials evaluating acupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for dental surgery. Both trials used pain following dental surgery as the outcome variable, and both included a blinding check to ascertain patients' beliefs regarding which treatment they were receiving. Although no statistically significant analgesic effect was observed between the acupuncture and placebo groups, participants in both experiments who believed they received real acupuncture reported significantly less pain than patients who believed that they received a placebo. Patients' beliefs regarding the receipt of acupuncture bore a stronger relationship to pain than any specific action possessed by acupuncture. These results also support the importance of both employing credible controls for the placebo effect in clinical trials and evaluating the credibility of those controls.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188558
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.17
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.879
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBarker Bausell, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorBergman, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, WLen_US
dc.contributor.authorBerman, BMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:16Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:16Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationEvaluation And The Health Professions, 2005, v. 28 n. 1, p. 9-26en_US
dc.identifier.issn0163-2787en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188558-
dc.description.abstractThis purpose of this article is to contrast the analgesic efficacy of acupuncture following dental surgery with the analgesic effects based on the expectation of benefit in two independently conducted placebo-controlled trials evaluating acupuncture as an adjunctive therapy for dental surgery. Both trials used pain following dental surgery as the outcome variable, and both included a blinding check to ascertain patients' beliefs regarding which treatment they were receiving. Although no statistically significant analgesic effect was observed between the acupuncture and placebo groups, participants in both experiments who believed they received real acupuncture reported significantly less pain than patients who believed that they received a placebo. Patients' beliefs regarding the receipt of acupuncture bore a stronger relationship to pain than any specific action possessed by acupuncture. These results also support the importance of both employing credible controls for the placebo effect in clinical trials and evaluating the credibility of those controls.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=9864en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEvaluation and the Health Professionsen_US
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Analgesiaen_US
dc.subject.meshDentistry - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshEvidence-Based Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMarylanden_US
dc.subject.meshMolar, Third - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshPain Measurementen_US
dc.subject.meshPlacebo Effecten_US
dc.subject.meshTooth Extraction - Methods - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTooth, Impacted - Surgeryen_US
dc.titleIs acupuncture analgesia an expectancy effect? Preliminary evidence based on participants' perceived assignments in two placebo-controlled trialsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0163278704273081en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15677384en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-13444300916en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-13444300916&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume28en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage9en_US
dc.identifier.epage26en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000226968800003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarker Bausell, R=6506303707en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBergman, S=7103168023en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, WL=7407085578en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBerman, BM=35458606800en_US

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