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Article: PSR J0357+3205: The tail of the turtle

TitlePSR J0357+3205: The tail of the turtle
Authors
KeywordsPulsars: General
Pulsars: Individual (Psr J0357+3205)
Stars: Neutron
X-Rays: Stars
Issue Date2013
PublisherInstitute of Physics Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X/
Citation
Astrophysical Journal, 2013, v. 765 n. 1 How to Cite?
AbstractUsing a new XMM-Newton observation, we have characterized the X-ray properties of the middle-aged radio-quiet γ-ray pulsar J0357+3205 (named Morla) and its tail. The X-ray emission from the pulsar is consistent with a magnetospheric non-thermal origin plus a thermal emission from a hot spot (or hot spots). The lack of a thermal component from the whole surface makes Morla the coldest neutron star in its age range. We found marginal evidence for a double-peaked modulation of the X-ray emission. The study of the 9′ long tail confirmed the lack of extended emission near the pulsar itself. The tail shows a very asymmetric brightness profile and its spectrum lacks any spatial variation. We found the nebular emission to be inconsistent with a classical bow shock, ram-pressure-dominated pulsar wind nebula. We propose thermal bremsstrahlung as an alternative mechanism for Morla's tail emission. In this scenario, the tail emission comes from the shocked interstellar medium (ISM) material heated up to X-ray temperatures. This can fully explain the peculiar features of the tail, assuming a hot, moderately dense ISM around the pulsar. For a bremsstrahlung-emitting tail, we can estimate the pulsar distance to be between 300 and 900 pc. A pulsar velocity of 1900 km s-1 is required, which would make Morla the pulsar with the largest velocity, and high inclination angles (>70°) are preferred. We propose Morla's nebula as the first example of a new "turtle's tail" class of thermally emitting nebulae associated with high-velocity pulsars. © 2013. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188434
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.909
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.266
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMarelli, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Luca, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorSalvetti, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorSartore, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorSartori, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorCaraveo, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorPizzolato, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaz Parkinson, PMen_US
dc.contributor.authorBelfiore, Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:05:59Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:05:59Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationAstrophysical Journal, 2013, v. 765 n. 1en_US
dc.identifier.issn0004-637Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188434-
dc.description.abstractUsing a new XMM-Newton observation, we have characterized the X-ray properties of the middle-aged radio-quiet γ-ray pulsar J0357+3205 (named Morla) and its tail. The X-ray emission from the pulsar is consistent with a magnetospheric non-thermal origin plus a thermal emission from a hot spot (or hot spots). The lack of a thermal component from the whole surface makes Morla the coldest neutron star in its age range. We found marginal evidence for a double-peaked modulation of the X-ray emission. The study of the 9′ long tail confirmed the lack of extended emission near the pulsar itself. The tail shows a very asymmetric brightness profile and its spectrum lacks any spatial variation. We found the nebular emission to be inconsistent with a classical bow shock, ram-pressure-dominated pulsar wind nebula. We propose thermal bremsstrahlung as an alternative mechanism for Morla's tail emission. In this scenario, the tail emission comes from the shocked interstellar medium (ISM) material heated up to X-ray temperatures. This can fully explain the peculiar features of the tail, assuming a hot, moderately dense ISM around the pulsar. For a bremsstrahlung-emitting tail, we can estimate the pulsar distance to be between 300 and 900 pc. A pulsar velocity of 1900 km s-1 is required, which would make Morla the pulsar with the largest velocity, and high inclination angles (>70°) are preferred. We propose Morla's nebula as the first example of a new "turtle's tail" class of thermally emitting nebulae associated with high-velocity pulsars. © 2013. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInstitute of Physics Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAstrophysical Journalen_US
dc.subjectPulsars: Generalen_US
dc.subjectPulsars: Individual (Psr J0357+3205)en_US
dc.subjectStars: Neutronen_US
dc.subjectX-Rays: Starsen_US
dc.titlePSR J0357+3205: The tail of the turtleen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSaz Parkinson, PM: pablosp@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySaz Parkinson, PM=rp01803en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/0004-637X/765/1/36en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84874131673en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84874131673&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume765en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000314957900036-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMarelli, M=25031722900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Luca, A=55589140500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSalvetti, D=15766003000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSartore, N=24588158400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSartori, A=36155571800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCaraveo, P=14006843000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPizzolato, F=9242136100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaz Parkinson, PM=8948464400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBelfiore, A=26535417200en_US

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