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postgraduate thesis: Parental characteristics towards child vaccination against pandemic influenza H1N1-2009

TitleParental characteristics towards child vaccination against pandemic influenza H1N1-2009
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Kim, M. [金美昭]. (2013). Parental characteristics towards child vaccination against pandemic influenza H1N1-2009. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5056168
AbstractBackground The pandemic of influenza A (H1N1-2009) virus was particularly widespread among children. Children and young adults were more likely to be infected than older adults, and infection among infants tended to lead to a higher risk of severe complications than among older children and adults. Vaccination against the virus was thus recommended as an effective countermeasure to protect these susceptible age strata from influenza infection and subsequent complications. Parental perception, attitudes and beliefs would thus play a major role in mitigating the pandemic influenza because these factors underlie the degree of vaccination uptake among children. Objective The primary aim of this study is to understand factors that are associated with parental acceptance of pediatric vaccination against influenza (H1N1-2009). The secondary aim is to consider the effective future vaccination campaign in the event of a pandemic and to increase child vaccination coverage. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search of the electronic databases, PubMed and the Web of Science. We identified and examined published literatures associated with parental acceptance dating back to the beginning of the 2009 pandemic. We extracted key datasets from these literatures, summarized the evidence systematically and determined the relationship amongst the aforementioned parental characteristics and acceptance of pandemic influenza vaccines. Results We included a total of 14 studies in this review. Our systematic review indicates that parents were more willing to accept H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination if 1) their children had previous experience with seasonal influenza; 2) they have had the pandemic influenza vaccine themselves; or 3) they intended to have their children vaccinated against seasonal influenza vaccine. We also founded that parental perceptions and attitudes towards both the influenza pandemic itself and the pandemic influenza vaccine are significantly associated with acceptance. Our study identified misperceptions and distrust in vaccine safety as the main reason for parents to refuse pandemic influenza vaccination for their children. In addition, we found that parents usually received negative appraisal on pediatric influenza vaccination from the media and tended to regard health care workers as the most reliable source of information on pediatric influenza vaccination. . Conclusions Parental perceptions are influential on pandemic influenza vaccine acceptance of their children. We affirm the importance of the role of health care workers in delivering appropriate information on influenza vaccines to parents in increasing pediatric vaccination uptake. We recommend public health officials to employ effective strategies for risk communication regarding pediatric influenza vaccines in order to increase the coverage and hence effectiveness of vaccination program against a future influenza pandemic.
DegreeMaster of Public Health
SubjectInfluenza vaccines.
Vaccination of children.
Dept/ProgramPublic Health

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKim, Mi-so.-
dc.contributor.author金美昭.-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationKim, M. [金美昭]. (2013). Parental characteristics towards child vaccination against pandemic influenza H1N1-2009. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5056168-
dc.description.abstractBackground The pandemic of influenza A (H1N1-2009) virus was particularly widespread among children. Children and young adults were more likely to be infected than older adults, and infection among infants tended to lead to a higher risk of severe complications than among older children and adults. Vaccination against the virus was thus recommended as an effective countermeasure to protect these susceptible age strata from influenza infection and subsequent complications. Parental perception, attitudes and beliefs would thus play a major role in mitigating the pandemic influenza because these factors underlie the degree of vaccination uptake among children. Objective The primary aim of this study is to understand factors that are associated with parental acceptance of pediatric vaccination against influenza (H1N1-2009). The secondary aim is to consider the effective future vaccination campaign in the event of a pandemic and to increase child vaccination coverage. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search of the electronic databases, PubMed and the Web of Science. We identified and examined published literatures associated with parental acceptance dating back to the beginning of the 2009 pandemic. We extracted key datasets from these literatures, summarized the evidence systematically and determined the relationship amongst the aforementioned parental characteristics and acceptance of pandemic influenza vaccines. Results We included a total of 14 studies in this review. Our systematic review indicates that parents were more willing to accept H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination if 1) their children had previous experience with seasonal influenza; 2) they have had the pandemic influenza vaccine themselves; or 3) they intended to have their children vaccinated against seasonal influenza vaccine. We also founded that parental perceptions and attitudes towards both the influenza pandemic itself and the pandemic influenza vaccine are significantly associated with acceptance. Our study identified misperceptions and distrust in vaccine safety as the main reason for parents to refuse pandemic influenza vaccination for their children. In addition, we found that parents usually received negative appraisal on pediatric influenza vaccination from the media and tended to regard health care workers as the most reliable source of information on pediatric influenza vaccination. . Conclusions Parental perceptions are influential on pandemic influenza vaccine acceptance of their children. We affirm the importance of the role of health care workers in delivering appropriate information on influenza vaccines to parents in increasing pediatric vaccination uptake. We recommend public health officials to employ effective strategies for risk communication regarding pediatric influenza vaccines in order to increase the coverage and hence effectiveness of vaccination program against a future influenza pandemic.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B50561686-
dc.subject.lcshInfluenza vaccines.-
dc.subject.lcshVaccination of children.-
dc.titleParental characteristics towards child vaccination against pandemic influenza H1N1-2009-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5056168-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Public Health-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePublic Health-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5056168-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

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