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Article: Elite Christianity and Spiritual Nationalism

TitleElite Christianity and Spiritual Nationalism
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherM.E. Sharpe, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mesharpe.com/mall/results1.asp?ACR=CSA
Citation
Chinese Sociological Review, 2013, v. 45 n. 2, p. 27-47 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper explores the intersection of spiritual renewal and grassroots nationalism within contemporary Chinese Christianity through the case of an emerging group of Christian businessmen who have spearheaded the growth of independent churches in the coastal Wenzhou area, called "boss Christians." Prompted by their success in the new entrepreneurial world, these elite male Christians strive to gain spiritual prestige and moral superiority in the Chinese church by employing a spiritual narrative of their post-Mao economic success and by articulating and spreading a new vision that they call "God's China vision." In active response to the Chinese state's nationalist discourse of modernity, they are convinced that China will rise not only in the economic sphere but also in the spiritual realm and will transform itself from a missionary-receiving country to a missionary-sending one. The paper links this grass-roots project of spiritual nationalism to a redemptive process in which elite Chinese Christians seek to address and overcome victimization and suffering inflicted by secular state modernity. It concludes that post-Mao Christian development has come to be closely connected to national memories and nationalist imagination, countering the party-state's insistence on secular nationalism.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187901
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCao, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-21T07:19:31Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-21T07:19:31Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationChinese Sociological Review, 2013, v. 45 n. 2, p. 27-47en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187901-
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the intersection of spiritual renewal and grassroots nationalism within contemporary Chinese Christianity through the case of an emerging group of Christian businessmen who have spearheaded the growth of independent churches in the coastal Wenzhou area, called "boss Christians." Prompted by their success in the new entrepreneurial world, these elite male Christians strive to gain spiritual prestige and moral superiority in the Chinese church by employing a spiritual narrative of their post-Mao economic success and by articulating and spreading a new vision that they call "God's China vision." In active response to the Chinese state's nationalist discourse of modernity, they are convinced that China will rise not only in the economic sphere but also in the spiritual realm and will transform itself from a missionary-receiving country to a missionary-sending one. The paper links this grass-roots project of spiritual nationalism to a redemptive process in which elite Chinese Christians seek to address and overcome victimization and suffering inflicted by secular state modernity. It concludes that post-Mao Christian development has come to be closely connected to national memories and nationalist imagination, countering the party-state's insistence on secular nationalism.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherM.E. Sharpe, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mesharpe.com/mall/results1.asp?ACR=CSAen_US
dc.relation.ispartofChinese Sociological Reviewen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleElite Christianity and Spiritual Nationalismen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCao, N: ncao@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCao, N=rp00850en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.2753/CSA2162-0555450202-
dc.identifier.hkuros217909en_US
dc.identifier.volume45en_US
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage27en_US
dc.identifier.epage47en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000318370500003-
dc.publisher.placeUKen_US

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