File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL
Supplementary

Article: Examining students' use of online annotation tools in support of argumentative reading

TitleExamining students' use of online annotation tools in support of argumentative reading
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherASCILITE. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet.html
Citation
Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 2013, v. 29 n. 2, p. 161-171 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study examined how students in a Hong Kong high school used Diigo, an online annotation tool, to support their argumentative reading activities. Two year 10 classes, a high-performance class (HPC) and an ordinary-performance class (OPC), highlighted passages of text and wrote and attached sticky notes to them to clarify argumentation structures and to represent and share argumentation processes. Analysis of annotations revealed that highlighting was the most frequently used online annotation feature. The HPC made significantly more sticky notes and used them more to annotate terms, claims and judgments than the OPC. The study suggests that Diigo is a promising tool for supporting reading-to-argue. The findings may be of value to teachers and researchers in designing online annotation tools that more effectively foster the process of reading-to-argue.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187587
ISSN
2012 Impact Factor: 1.363

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLu, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorDeng, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-21T07:03:44Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-21T07:03:44Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationAustralasian Journal of Educational Technology, 2013, v. 29 n. 2, p. 161-171en_US
dc.identifier.issn1449-3098-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187587-
dc.description.abstractThis study examined how students in a Hong Kong high school used Diigo, an online annotation tool, to support their argumentative reading activities. Two year 10 classes, a high-performance class (HPC) and an ordinary-performance class (OPC), highlighted passages of text and wrote and attached sticky notes to them to clarify argumentation structures and to represent and share argumentation processes. Analysis of annotations revealed that highlighting was the most frequently used online annotation feature. The HPC made significantly more sticky notes and used them more to annotate terms, claims and judgments than the OPC. The study suggests that Diigo is a promising tool for supporting reading-to-argue. The findings may be of value to teachers and researchers in designing online annotation tools that more effectively foster the process of reading-to-argue.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherASCILITE. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet.html-
dc.relation.ispartofAustralasian Journal of Educational Technologyen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleExamining students' use of online annotation tools in support of argumentative readingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLu, J: jingyan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLu, J=rp00930en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros219482en_US
dc.identifier.volume29en_US
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage161en_US
dc.identifier.epage171en_US
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats