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Book Chapter: Late Quaternary relative sea-level changes in the tropics

TitleLate Quaternary relative sea-level changes in the tropics
Authors
KeywordsBeach rock
Continental shelf
Coral
Equatorial oceans
Eustatic changes
Issue Date2013
PublisherElsevier
Citation
Late Quaternary relative sea-level changes in the tropics. In Elias, SA & Mock, CJ (Eds.), Encyclopedia of quaternary science (2nd ed.), v. 4, p. 495-502. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2013 How to Cite?
AbstractThe tropics are the geographical zone farthest from the polar ice sheets and have been little affected by glacio-isostatic processes during the glacial cycles of the Later Quaternary. Consequently, the sea-level history in the tropics is unique, and it reflects, to a great extent, the eustatic sea-level change. In the tropics, there are many proxy records suitable for reconstructing former sea-level positions. In particular, reef-building corals, mangrove peat, beach rock, and tubeworms on rock faces are all good sea-level indicators. The best sets of sea-level data come from the region between the Australian and Asian continents, as well as the Caribbean. These sea-level data have been used to reconstruct a complete sea-level history representative of the tropics for the past 20 000 years. It shows the position of the sea-level lowstand for the Last Glacial Maximum, phases of rapid rise of sea level, and the mid-Holocene sea-level highstand. The sea-level curve not only reveals the eustatic sea-level history, but also provides useful information about the characteristics of ice sheet melting, thus providing useful constraints on geophysical models.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187415
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZong, Yen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:43:52Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:43:52Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationLate Quaternary relative sea-level changes in the tropics. In Elias, SA & Mock, CJ (Eds.), Encyclopedia of quaternary science (2nd ed.), v. 4, p. 495-502. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2013en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780444536433-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187415-
dc.description.abstractThe tropics are the geographical zone farthest from the polar ice sheets and have been little affected by glacio-isostatic processes during the glacial cycles of the Later Quaternary. Consequently, the sea-level history in the tropics is unique, and it reflects, to a great extent, the eustatic sea-level change. In the tropics, there are many proxy records suitable for reconstructing former sea-level positions. In particular, reef-building corals, mangrove peat, beach rock, and tubeworms on rock faces are all good sea-level indicators. The best sets of sea-level data come from the region between the Australian and Asian continents, as well as the Caribbean. These sea-level data have been used to reconstruct a complete sea-level history representative of the tropics for the past 20 000 years. It shows the position of the sea-level lowstand for the Last Glacial Maximum, phases of rapid rise of sea level, and the mid-Holocene sea-level highstand. The sea-level curve not only reveals the eustatic sea-level history, but also provides useful information about the characteristics of ice sheet melting, thus providing useful constraints on geophysical models.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier-
dc.relation.ispartofEncyclopedia of quaternary science (2nd ed.)en_US
dc.subjectBeach rock-
dc.subjectContinental shelf-
dc.subjectCoral-
dc.subjectEquatorial oceans-
dc.subjectEustatic changes-
dc.titleLate Quaternary relative sea-level changes in the tropicsen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailZong, Y: yqzong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZong, Y=rp00846en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/B978-0-444-53643-3.00142-4-
dc.identifier.hkuros219150en_US
dc.identifier.volume4en_US
dc.identifier.spage495en_US
dc.identifier.epage502en_US
dc.publisher.placeAmsterdam-

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