File Download
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Organisational Culture of Construction Joint Ventures: Case Studies in Hong Kong

TitleOrganisational Culture of Construction Joint Ventures: Case Studies in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsCulture
International construction
Joint venture
Parent companies
Hong Kong
Issue Date2008
PublisherTongji University.
Citation
International Conference On Multi-National Construction Projects: “Securing High Performance Through Cultural Awareness And Dispute Avoidance”, Tongji University, Shanghai, China. November 21-23, 2008 How to Cite?
AbstractCulture can be regarded as a system of shared meanings that organises values into mental programmes which guide the behaviours of people within communities – notably, nations and organisations. Organisational culture involves cognition, affect and behaviour and reflects customary thinking, feeling and acting that are attributed to a particular group of people as they learn to cope with their environment. Largely, behaviours of organisations depend on the decisions and business strategies of top management and are greatly influenced by culture. There is a close relationship between the characteristics of organisational culture in a joint venture (JV) organisation and the parent companies; often, the organisational culture of the (most) powerful parent company dominates. That reflection relates to the top management’s strategy and the allocation of authority among JV partners. The two case studies investigate the organisational culture of international JV projects in Hong Kong that pool resources from parents with different cultural backgrounds. One of the case studies compares the JV organizational culture with the parent companies from UK, Hong Kong and mainland China. The organizational cultures of the parent companies are consistent with their own national cultural characteristics but, in the JV where more than one national culture is involved, the JV organizational culture is highly influenced by the dominant national culture of the management team. In the second case study, the project director is seconded from the dominant parent company. That JV exhibits cultural characteristics which show a synergy of elements from the founding parents but with emphasis on the culture of the dominant partner in the JV.
DescriptionCIB W112
Includes bibliographical references.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187319

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, AMMen_US
dc.contributor.authorFellows, RICHARDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:36:46Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:36:46Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Conference On Multi-National Construction Projects: “Securing High Performance Through Cultural Awareness And Dispute Avoidance”, Tongji University, Shanghai, China. November 21-23, 2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187319-
dc.descriptionCIB W112-
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.-
dc.description.abstractCulture can be regarded as a system of shared meanings that organises values into mental programmes which guide the behaviours of people within communities – notably, nations and organisations. Organisational culture involves cognition, affect and behaviour and reflects customary thinking, feeling and acting that are attributed to a particular group of people as they learn to cope with their environment. Largely, behaviours of organisations depend on the decisions and business strategies of top management and are greatly influenced by culture. There is a close relationship between the characteristics of organisational culture in a joint venture (JV) organisation and the parent companies; often, the organisational culture of the (most) powerful parent company dominates. That reflection relates to the top management’s strategy and the allocation of authority among JV partners. The two case studies investigate the organisational culture of international JV projects in Hong Kong that pool resources from parents with different cultural backgrounds. One of the case studies compares the JV organizational culture with the parent companies from UK, Hong Kong and mainland China. The organizational cultures of the parent companies are consistent with their own national cultural characteristics but, in the JV where more than one national culture is involved, the JV organizational culture is highly influenced by the dominant national culture of the management team. In the second case study, the project director is seconded from the dominant parent company. That JV exhibits cultural characteristics which show a synergy of elements from the founding parents but with emphasis on the culture of the dominant partner in the JV.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTongji University.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectCulture-
dc.subjectInternational construction-
dc.subjectJoint venture-
dc.subjectParent companies-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.titleOrganisational Culture of Construction Joint Ventures: Case Studies in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLiu, AMM: ammliu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLiu, AMM=rp01432en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros218110en_US
dc.publisher.placeChina-
dc.customcontrol.immutableyiu 140318-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats